Archive for the ‘Black History’ Category

God Can Change Racist’s and Abortionist’s Hearts

Monday, June 24th, 2013

130624 blog image

Praise GOD! I will be a Wall of HOLY GHOST FIRE ALL AROUND YOU SAITH THE LORD. Zechariah 2:5. Shout Alleluia if you believe!!!

In a recent correspondence with my friend Day Gardner, we are remarking on what God is doing to stir up the faithful. As the battle for life rages, we are praying for more victories. The news is encouraging! Please allow me to share some of our exchange with you.

Yes Day, the Holy Ghost Fire keeps raining on us! For example, as Father Frank Pavone continues to call leaders, laypersons and people at large to attention as seen on Fox News, we are sure to see more and more courage enacted from our spiritual leaders. In an open letter he is calling out House Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the world watching. Watch the Fox & Friends video HERE.

Remember our challenge to former Speaker Pelosi a while back? How Nancy Pelosi literally ran from us when she saw us sitting on the front row of the ceremony that day!

As to Father Terry, and you, Dr. Johnny and Pastor Broden, I say rain on. Wish I could have been there with you to help slay the three headed beast of racism, reproductive genocide and sexual perversion.

I saw Fr. Terry’s passion in the pictures from the press conference, and I applaud him for his dedication to the unborn. I also understand that Cardinal DiNardo is a defender of the unborn himself. So in keeping with the philosophy of encouraging all pro-lifers to remember that while methods may differ we are all in the same battle, let’s pray for them both. We need them and we all need each other.

By the way Day, on their radio show this week, our colleagues Wil and Meeke Addison asked for a take on the latest Paula Deen story about alleged racist remarks. I explained how I learned a long time ago when racist Governor George Wallace had a change of heart that since all have sinned and fallen short of God’s glory, there is room at the cross for everyone. I met Paula by the way, and she and her family were very gracious and down to earth that day.

Did I ever tell you about how God moved on the heart of the Georgia Legislature to pass the King Holiday Bill? I only bring this up to remind us that God can use us to help prick the ice and change the hearts of racists and yes, abortionists.

Georgia House Speaker Tom Murphy (2nd from right) with (left to right) Mrs. Alveda King Beal (state rep. 28th Dist.), Rev. Martin L. King Senior, Dr. Benjamin Mayes, and Coretta Scott King. They game to try to persuade Murphy to declare Martin Luther King. Jr. Birthday a state holiday. He said no. Photo taken January 8, 1979. (BILL MAHAN/AJC staff)

Georgia House Speaker Tom Murphy (2nd from right) with (left to right) Mrs. Alveda King Beal (state rep. 28th Dist.), Rev. Martin L. King Senior, Dr. Benjamin Mayes, and Coretta Scott King. They game to try to persuade Murphy to declare Martin Luther King. Jr. Birthday a state holiday. He said no. Photo taken January 8, 1979. (BILL MAHAN/AJC staff)

When I was a State Legislator in Georgia from the 28th House District in the 70’s and 80’s, I was told that the MLK Holiday Bill couldn’t pass, and would never come out of committee to the floor. Hosea Williams and I were the primary sponsors of the Bill. I wasn’t even born again back then, but I was a bit like David I guess, and a bit like my Dad A. D. and Uncle M. L. in that I knew that God was bigger than those legislators and officials. When my colleagues balled up the copies of the bill, threw them in spittoons and spit tobacco juice on them in front of my face, I forgave them and kept praying. I asked my granddaddy, Daddy King and Aunt Coretta to come to the Capitol for a visit. Finally after much prayer, I requested a private meeting with House Speaker Tom Murphy; considered by some to be a noted segregationist/racist at one time in Georgia’s history. The meeting was miraculously granted, and as I sat before him in tears actually, (I was young back then, and cried more easily than I do today) I asked him to explain why his stance was fair. He said something like, “Miss Alveda, I can’t promise you that the bill will pass, but it will go to the floor.” The bill went to the floor and the rest is history.

Can I take credit for the passage of the Bill? Can any human? Of course not. It was an act of GOD! As in the case of Rosa Parks, MLK, and any servant of God, our Creator could have used a rock or a donkey/ass to deliver His message; whether it be to end racism or abortion or even the stand for natural procreative marriage. It just takes faith, love and obedience to be used as a “voice crying out in the wilderness.”

So my friends, I hope you’ve enjoyed what a conversation between pro-life friends looks and sounds like. Day and I are in this fight together as we all are. While we don’t always agree, we always agree to listen, pray and love each other. We often say that we shall overcome abortion as in the Spirit of God, we pray for Rain and continue to march on until victory is won!

www.africanamericanoutreach.com

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Become An Abolitionist! Help us #AbolishAbortion

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

slavery_abortion_graphic

Another Juneteenth is just around the corner, June 19, 2013, and the babies in the womb are still not free.

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

Not until the Emancipation Proclamation were slaves considered persons for the purposes of rights. Yet, still today, 50 years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation and 48 years since Juneteenth, there are people that our country still considers non-persons.

Many babies in their mothers’ wombs, human babies, human people, have been claimed as property by their mothers when they claim, “It’s my body and I can do whatever I want with it.” These babies have been claimed as property belonging to the mothers and can be disposed of as the mother so wished and our government condones it. No, the government champions that right. Usurping any rights that the babies have to life for the mothers’ choice to kill their babies.

Just as in the 1800s there was a need for some people to fight for the rights of others, so it is today but in a more profound way. Today, the pre-born babies don’t have the opportunity to run away from their ‘masters.’ Today, the pre-born babies can’t ask for their life or rights be given to them. Today, the pre-born babies die in silence. Today, the pre-born die in excruciating pain. Today, the pre-born babies sometimes struggle to be born only to be killed seconds or minutes later or just left to drown in a toilet or die in a garbage can.

In a world where we must save and protect the ladybugs, the harbor seal, sea turtle and their eggs and countless others endangered animals; I would think that on top of that list would be all humans, born and pre-born, young and old, regardless of disabilities.

What does that say about our society? Or our country?

Get involved in the abolition movement of our day! Get involved and help Abolish Abortion!

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Dr. Alveda King Remembers the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

mlk-in-birmingham-jail

On this, the 50th anniversary of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous Letter from a Birmingham Jail, his niece, Dr. Alveda King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, says her uncle’s letter applies just as profoundly today to abortion as it did in 1963 to segregation.

Alveda is joined by Father Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life who today said: “Today, that letter still speaks. Just as it spoke in his day on behalf of those who suffered the violence of segregation, so now it speaks for those who suffer the violence of abortion.”

Alveda adds, “If Uncle M.L. were alive today, he would surely include the 21st century womb babies and their mothers in his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” The atrocity of abortion in America has killed millions of human babies who are often considered to be property, chattels, and less than human.

“In his 1963 letter, he wrote that segregation ‘ends up relegating persons to the status of things.’ Change ‘segregation’ to ‘abortion’ and you have the year 2013.

“Jim Crow laws gave us the continuing dehumanization of African Americans, beatings, lynchings, and the Ku Klux Klan. Roe v. Wade has given us the dehumanization of unborn and, now, born babies, skull crushings, spine snippings. Consider Kermit Gosnell in Philadelphia; the Planned Parenthood Chicago facility that killed Tonya Reaves; and all of the other hundreds of abortion providers and Planned Parenthood officials who can’t say whether fully born babies who survive abortions should be helped to live.

“In the Letter from a Birmingham Jail, Uncle M. L. noted that by their effort and example, early Christians ‘brought an end to such evils as infanticide’ in the Greco-Roman world. We now know, however, that the Greco-Roman world has been revived in abortion clinics across the land. Where the ancients would leave their unwanted babies to die of exposure, abortionists now leave their ‘mistakes’ to die in corners or closets – or worse.

My Uncle M.L. once wrote in 1953 that the most segregated hour in America is 11:00 am on Sunday because back then Blacks and Whites didn’t often worship together.

Fast forward to 2013, where minority mothers and our babies are targeted by abortion providers as the most vulnerable recipients of abortion in the name of women’s rights and solutions to poverty. Even Gosnell, whose defense lawyer said if women want Mayo Clinic standards they should go to Mayo Clinic, yes, even Gosnell’s House of Horrors had a slightly cleaner “White Only” surgical room, while Black women and their babies were butchered in a torture chamber in another section of the abortion mill. All the while, they all keep trying to hide the fact that all abortions are dangerous to a woman’s health, her baby’s life, and generally result in death and misery.

This all leads me to say that the most segregated place a woman can go today is an abortion mill! And no ludicrous references to a 1966 deceptive Planned Parenthood Award offered to MLK and accepted by his wife, not him, is going to trick people into believing that my uncle would condone slaughtering babies and damaging their mothers in the name of justice.

“Uncle M. L. even once asked: ‘How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: ‘An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The Reverend King was a man of God and a preacher of the Word. He sought a peace that was not just the absence of tension, but the presence of justice. He would agree that there can be no real peace in a society that tolerates injustice. He would most certainly agree that the taking of innocent lives is a horrible injustice. There is no doubt that just as my Uncle M.L. called America’s clergy to awaken 50 years ago to the moral transgression of segregation, he would today sound out a call for a moral awakening and urge all Americans and indeed all human beings around the world today to awaken to the grievous wrong of abortion, and the subsequent devastation of natural marriage and family.”

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Remembering Uncle M. L.: Alveda King reflects on the death of the Dreamer

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

MLK Collage

Forty-five years ago today, my Uncle M.L., the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered by an assassin’s bullet. Sometimes I wonder what life would be like if that shot had never been fired; what our nation would be like if that bullet had missed. Many are the times I wish he were here.

But though Uncle M.L. is no longer with us on earth, his voice lives on in the words he used to change our nation in the cause of justice.

We are a more just society today because of Martin Luther King, Jr. Not because he brought new ideas into the public consciousness, but because he reminded us of fundamental, eternal truths – truths that needed to be restated and lived out. He once asked and answered this question: “How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust?” He went on to explain:

“A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: ‘An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

These timeless truths must be restated again today.

Remember Reverend Martin Luther King – let us not forget that he was an ordained Baptist minister and preacher of the Word of God – taught that we are to respect the law. But he also taught that there is a law higher than man’s. There are no commands more deserving of obedience than God’s.

Those commands caused Uncle M. L. to look beyond city ordinances, state statutes, or even federal law for guidance. He believed that those ordinances, statutes, and laws were to be respected, but that they were to be weighed against God’s law or what some would term natural law to determine if they were just.

The same is true today. But some still look to themselves to determine right and wrong.

We are told by the Obama administration that it is “unjust” that women should have to buy their own birth control pills, so everyone else must reach into their pockets to pay for them.

We are told by abortion advocates that it is “unjust” that some women cannot afford to abort their babies, so tax dollars must be used to finance the killing of those children.

We are told by same-sex “marriage” advocates that it is “unjust” that men cannot marry other men and women cannot marry other women, so 2,000 years of wisdom must be abandoned.

And yet, the Bible tells us that human life is sacred. We are thereby to choose life over abortion. The Bible teaches us that natural marriage between one man and one woman is part of the procreative process. We are thereby compelled to choose holy and procreative matrimony.

In forgetting our heritage, in distancing ourselves from God’s moral rules, we are doing Uncle M. L. a disservice, and we are in danger of coming face to face with disaster. So, in remembering Uncle M. L. today, I urge America and the world to remember that he was a servant of God who, though imperfect, tried to point people to the truth.

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

A Tale of Two Movements: A Women’s History Month Reflection

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

SPACER130327 blog image

Oppression of women and children is not new to America. In the midst of the 21st Century battle for the children in the womb and the women and mothers who are harmed by abortion and dangerous contraceptives, it seems fitting to remember the valiant freedom fighters and abolitionists who fought for freedom in the previous centuries.

In the past, two American movements, The Abolishment of Slavery of Black People and The Women’s Suffrage Movement grew along together. Slavery as a legal institution began in the early years of the American Colonial era and was fully established by the time the United States sought independence from Great Britain in 1776. By 1804, the northern states instituted abolition laws. By the 1850s the South was still defending slavery and its expansion into the territories. A growing number of northern abolitionists denounced the sin of slavery and a growing anti-slavery Abolitionist Movement rejected slavery as a deterrent to the rights of free men. These actions led to the American Civil War. In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln freed slaves in the southern states through the Emancipation Proclamation. The Thirteenth Amendment, taking effect in December 1865, permanently abolished slavery throughout the entire United States, including the Border states, such as Kentucky, which still had about 50,000 slaves, and the Indian tribes.

While there were champions for the rights of women from the inception of America, a formal movement was launched around 1848 with the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 which formulated the demand for women’s suffrage. The women’s battle was tempered during the Civil War, and the flames were fanned anew and the battle continued.

In 1869 the proposed Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave the vote to black men, split the movement. Campaigners such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton refused to endorse the amendment, as it did not give the vote to women. Others, such as Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe argued that if black men were enfranchised, it would help women achieve their goal. The conflict caused two organizations to emerge, the National Woman Suffrage Association, which campaigned for women’s suffrage at a federal level as well as for married women to be given property rights, and the American Woman Suffrage Association, which aimed to secure women’s suffrage through state legislation.

The groups merged and after 1900 made a new argument to the effect that women’s alleged superior characteristics, especially purity, immunity from corruption and concern with children and local issues, made their votes essential to promoting the reforms of the Progressive Era. Women’s contributions to American participation in the First World War (1917–18) gave the impetus for final victory.

Today, there is still a division in the ranks of women as to what the definition of women’s rights should be. Some women believe that a woman’s rights include the right to kill a baby in her womb. Other women believe that the baby in the womb is a distinctly separate individual person from the mother, and should therefore have civil rights, including the right to live. And there are also many who believe that slavery, women’s rights and abortion are inextricably connected.

Dr. Karen Stevenson, MD, a pro-life advocate, has written an insightful paper that confirms new views on the connection between racism, slavery, and abortion.

While studying the connection between abortion and slavery, one might wish to consider the research respectfully submitted by those who are determined to get to the bottom of the controversies and shed some light on the issue.

1. Excerpt from Utrum by Dr. Karen Stevenson

“As Kathleen Neal Cleaver states in her review of Dorothy Roberts’ book, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the meaning of Liberty, “Roberts learned the significance of reproductive autonomy not from the contemporary abortion movement but from studying the histories of slave women who fought to gain control over their lives.”[1] Any treatise that discusses black women and their reproductive freedoms must take into account the impact of these freedoms on the black community as a whole. Thus, any issue germane to African-American women is also crucial to the welfare of the African-American family and by extension, the African-American community.

Abortion benefits African-American women because it allows them to exercise control over their reproductive destinies.

Slave women in America did not have the right to self-determination, and they had no autonomy over their bodies in any way. The profit driven slave economy benefitted tremendously from their toil and their procreative abilities. The slave woman’s children were not her own, and by the whim of her master, they could be sold away from her, never to be seen again. In post Civil War America, there was no further need for black women to procreate. In fact, her ability to procreate no longer served the greater good.”

2. Excerpt from 2013 Message by Dr. Alveda King

“One can’t help but consider if disregard for the value of women and children is still at the root of abortion today. Consider this, many if not all of the women abolitionists should have been the forerunners of the Pro-Life Movement. Instead, we have a counterfeit “Women’s Rights Movement” which supports abortion and harmful contraceptive drugs today. Why in the world, how in the world could this be?

Remember, both women and men were allowed to be involved with the Anti-Slavery act. But, women could only go so far because they couldn’t vote, and many could not own property. Non-African Women and all slaves were actually considered to be chattel or property back then. So, it was hard for white and black women to be involved as abolitionists because white women were treated in very similar manner to African Americans, and most Black women were slaves. Unfortunately, the same thing was happening to the Native American Population. They were all considered to be chattels.

So the frustrated slave women often aborted their babies (Pure Breed and Mulatto) voluntarily as an act against sustaining future oppression. The Angry Caucasian Wives often coerced or forced abortion on their husband’s “Black Beauties” as a means of retaliation against their own brand of experienced oppression.

If you think about it, the same issues are at the heart of the Middle East Conflict. Sarah’s and Hagar’s sons are brothers with Abraham’s seed, yet their bitter battle still rages. My, what a bitter root of judgment in all these situations!

While many women who were abolitionists ended up becoming women rights activists, bitterness caused them to adopt a contraceptives agenda and finally an abortion agenda to exercise what they considered to be rights over their wombs. So now we have a war on babies and the wombs often led by women and men controlled by a desire for revenge and avarice.”

Read the full text of 2013 message HERE

3. Excerpt from “Jealousy of the Slave Mistresses”

“It is a fact generally observed in slave societies that the mistress is more cruel in her treatment of slaves than the master. It is a fact confirmed by our chronicles, our folklore, our oral tradition, and travelers. There are on record not two or three, but scores of cases of the cruelty of the senhoras de engenho toward defenseless slaves.”

As a post abortive African American Woman, I can attest that abortion kills babies and harms and even sometimes kills their mothers. I bear the harmful fruit of my own abortions in my own body in the form of phlebitis and other lingering health problems from the abortion surgeries and subsequent abortion drugs called contraceptives also meted out to me by Planned Parenthood during my childbearing years. My complete testimony can be found at www.silentnomoreawareness.org. Read HERE or watch HERE

Planned Parenthood, a leader in the women’s movement that believes that the right to kill a baby in the womb is legitimate, lied to me about abortion. They said abortion is safe. It isn’t. Ask all of the dead women and sick women victims of abortion.

While many good hearted people like Susan B. Anthony were abolitionists and supported life affirming women’s rights; at the same time there were many women who were abolitionists that ended up becoming women rights/abortion rights activists whose bitterness caused them to adopt a deceptive contraceptives and finally an abortion “choice” agenda to exercise what they considered to be rights over their wombs.

So now, though the Civil War is over and the Suffragettes Movement is won, we have a war on babies and the wombs of women often led by women and men controlled by a desire for revenge and avarice.

Abortion kills babies and hurts women which is why I recommend that you read Janet Morana’s book RECALL ABORTION.

Also, I invite you to read our book LIFE AT ALL COSTS to receive further enlightenment on these issues, including how Jesus healed my abortion pain.

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

When a Nation Becomes Obsolete

Friday, March 15th, 2013

ga-cotton-field-library-of

A few days ago, a person who is a highly respected professional shared a series of blogs with me. The title of the first article, “With no more cotton to pick, what will America do with 40 million black people?” resonated in my being, again. Mark Crutcher of Life Dynamics asks virtually the same question in his best selling documentary Maafa 21. I found this observation chilling in Maafa 21, and just as disturbing by this new release of information in the blog series.

The article starts out by saying that “America is now getting out of the Black people business.” Well, in the African American community, we have known this little secret piece of news for years. Once slavery was over, our people became a burden rather than the high premium free labor we had been during slavery days.

The African American community is a nation within the nation called America. Often, we are still treated as second class citizens. Of course, in Christ we can ultimately agree that there is one human race, and all human beings, born and unborn are created equal, and endowed by our Creator, God, with certain inalienable rights.

In my own testimony as an African American woman, I experienced racial targeting by the abortion industry. I talk about it in my book, How Can The Dream Survive If We Murder The Children? (Also available from your local book retailer)

While we are waiting for America and indeed the world to get this memo, perhaps you will find some of the information in these pages of interest.

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Smiles of Victory

Tuesday, February 12th, 2013

SPACER
“The joy of The Lord is your strength.” – Nehemiah 8:10

Walter Hoye at NAACP Protest

Our good friend Rev. Walter Hoye of www.issues4life.org and a youth for life took a moment at the NAACP Image Awards Protest during Black History Month to show the world a victory smile.

Black Prolife leaders from across the country led the protest in LA on February 1, 2013. The night before, the National Black Prolife Coalition and Students for Life hosted a Maafa21.com screening at the University of Southern California.

Bryan with YouthsThe youth in the picture with Walter and the hundreds of thousands of youth who attend the walks and marches are proof positive that we are winning because God hears the cries of the children and the repentant prayers of the elders.

“If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land. – 2 Chronicles 7:14

In light of recent developments, including the NAACP exposé and uncovering of the truth that abortions and contraceptives kill babies and their mothers, we thank God that the truth is getting out.

The NAACP doesn’t like the light of truth being shined on them that they will go to any length to stop us as evident by the recent threat of legal action against Ryan Bomberger of The Radiance Foundation, a bullying tactive in an attempt to silence someone who is simply telling the truth.

In the battle to defund planned parenthood and recall abortion, we are always encouraged when the young people join the fight.

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Black History Month Tribute: Strength, Persistence, Talent

Monday, February 11th, 2013

Black History Month

Contributor & author: Marilyn M. Singleton, MD, JD, (San Francisco) board-certified anesthesiologist, professor, lawyer and Association of American Physicians and Surgeons member (see bio at bottom of release)

Interview – Contact Dr. Singleton directly at marilynmsingleton@gmail.com, 510-421-5800, http://www.aapsonline.org/, (reporters and journalists welcome!)

For permission to publish this article (word count: 672), contact AngelPublicity@aol.com for a prompt response

Author/contributor: Marilyn M. Singleton, M.D., J.D.

Black history in American has certainly had its ups and downs. It’s troubling when, for political theater, those who should know better fail to emphasize the inspirational stories that highlight the strengths of blacks and the humanity of whites. While it is undeniable that cruelty and suffering are part of this country’s history, at some point it is counterproductive to paint blacks as weak victims of the white man’s callousness.

There were always free blacks in America (including my family). Indeed, in 1641, Mathias De Sousa, an African indentured servant who came from England with Lord Baltimore, was elected to Maryland’s General Assembly. The first census of 1790 counted 19 per cent black Americans, 10 per cent of whom were free.

Black Americans served on both sides during the Revolutionary War. The British promised freedom to slaves belonging to Patriot masters who served. Because of his manpower shortages, George Washington lifted the ban on black enlistment in the Continental Army in January 1776, creating his so-called “mixed multitude,” which was 15 per cent black. Economist Walter Williams is so correct that necessity can overcome prejudice.

Nestled in the back of some folks’ minds was (is?) the notion that blacks were not as intelligent as whites. They certainly couldn’t have had the smarts to be doctors. James Derham (c. 1757-1802?), born a slave in Philadelphia, proved the naysayers wrong. He was the first known black American physician, although not professionally trained in medical school. As was common at the time, physicians were trained in apprenticeships. Young Derham was fortunate that his three early masters were physicians who taught him to read and write.

Derham’s third owner taught the young teen how to mix and administer medicines. After this owner, who had been arrested during the war for being a Tory, died in prison, Derham was sold to a British officer, and he served as a doctor to soldiers. After the war, he became the property of a Scottish physician (appropriately named Dr. Love) from New Orleans, who hired him to work as a medical assistant and apothecary.

By 1783, Derham quickly saved enough money to buy his freedom, and he set up his own medical practice in New Orleans. Derham, who spoke English, French, and Spanish, was a popular and highly regarded doctor, who treated both black and white patients. By age 30, Derham earned more than $3,000 annually.

Derham’s medical paper on his success in treating diphtheria caught the attention of Benjamin Rush, a physician who signed the Declaration of Independence, served as surgeon general of the Continental Army, and has been called “the father of American medicine.” Rush invited Derham to Philadelphia in 1788 and was so impressed that he encouraged him to stay. There, Derham became an expert in throat diseases and in the relationship between weather and disease.

In 1789, Derham returned to New Orleans, where he saved many yellow fever victims. He stopped practicing medicine in 1801, when the new city regulations required a formal medical degree to be considered a doctor. Nothing is known of his whereabouts after 1802.

The first university-trained black American physician was James McCune Smith, born in 1813 to slave parents who were emancipated by New York law. Despite his scholastic achievements at the Free African School of New York, he was denied admission to American medical schools. When he was 19 years old, the Glasgow Emancipation Society helped Smith enroll in Scotland’s University of Glasgow. He received his B.A. degree in 1835 and his M.D. degree in 1837. A skilled debater and lecturer, Smith was a founding member of the New York Statistics Society in 1852, and was elected as an early member of the American Geographic Society.

The first American medical degree was conferred on David J. Peck, born circa 1826 into a free black family in Pittsburgh, Pa. In 1846, after studying two years with a private physician, he enrolled in Rush Medical College and graduated in 1847. Peck practiced medicine in Philadelphia for 2 years before moving to Central America to start a homeland for free blacks in Nicaragua.

Thank you, doctors, for paving the way for my grandfather, my father, and me.

aapsonline.org

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Birthday Message

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

MLK  Tribute Book

I’m 62 years and 9 months old today. Read about my Granddaddy’ vision and my miracle birth HERE

Also check out King Family baby pictures in our new book HERE or HERE

Thanks be to God. “This is the day that The Lord has made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it.”

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.

Pro-life Concerns Mentioned at King Memorial

Monday, January 21st, 2013

Priests for Life

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: January 21, 2013

Contact: Leslie Palma
347-286-7277

ATLANTA, GA. — Having just returned from the 45th Martin Luther King, Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, issued the following statement:

“I was pleased to join with the King family once again today in honoring the memory and recommitting ourselves to the Dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In particular, Elder Bernice King, Martin’s daughter, made reference to the fact that Dr. King was not just speaking for the Negro, but ‘for all marginalized people,’ and she referred to the need to affirm the ‘personhood’ of all.

“The keynote speaker, Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, made this even more explicit when he said that living out the dream of Dr. King, and seeking justice, require that we end violence ‘in and outside the womb’ and that part of the cry of justice today is to ‘defend life.’

“On this holiday in honor of Dr. King, I want to again bring attention to the statement, The Beloved Community and the Unborn, signed by several members of the King family. And on this eve of the completion of 40 years since Roe vs. Wade, may we all recommit ourselves to the dream that one day our unborn brothers and sisters will be able to say, Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit www.priestsforlife.org.

Click here to leave a comment for
the article above.