Archive for the ‘King Rules’ Category

“Everything Has a Different “Why,” But the Results Still Make Me Cry.”

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

MLK“The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it….

“Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness:
only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

“Strength to Love,” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1963

A young man is shot dead by a policeman in Missouri. A photojournalist is horrendously executed by Islamists. A dear friend’s niece and her baby are killed and their bodies burned in a family dispute.

Three non-related events have touched me deeply in recent days, each having a different “why,” but each making me cry.

I am on my way to Ferguson, Missouri now. There is grief, anger, and uncertainty there. But also there, somewhere, is the truth of how and why Michael Brown died.

That truth will be revealed in time.

We yearn, of course, for immediate answers and swift justice. There can be no justice, though, without truth. And without peace, the search for truth becomes more difficult.

In some instances, such as what happened to James Foley at the hands of ISIS or my friend’s niece and her baby at the hands of a rage-driven relative, the truth is plain to see. No explanation could possibly justify what their killers did. We know who the wrongdoers are and whatever their rationales for their actions, those rationales are woefully insufficient.

In the case of Michael Brown, we have conflicting reports as to the events that led to his shooting. The jury is not in. Yet, rather than wait for the truth, some have acted from a deep-seated sense that they already know the truth. In the name of “justice,” some victims have inflicted great injustices on themselves and the collective by turning to violence. In their pain and anger, they have brought more harm than good.

Now, I’m not saying we shouldn’t have righteous anger at acts of oppression, hatred, or cruelty that are offenses before God. God’s Word teaches us, though, that we should be slow to anger. And we should be careful to distinguish human emotional outrage over an offense to ourselves versus an offense to God. God’s righteous anger is most powerful; seeking to restore righteousness, not trample upon it by committing more wrongs.

In my book KING RULES I write about how my uncle, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and my father, the Rev. Alfred Daniel Williams King, knew injustice. They, like millions of other African Americans, needed no introduction; injustice greeted them virtually every day of their lives. But they also knew peace in their hearts, the peace that surpasses all understanding. And from this peace, they sought and achieved a modicum of justice for the masses.

three headed monster Revised2Yet Ferguson teaches us that the dream is still lacking. Until we slay the three headed beast of racism, reproductive genocide and sexual perversion, we still have mountains to climb and to overcome.

We live in a corrupt world. Yet God’s Word teaches us not to repay evil with evil. Instead we must live to overcome evil with good.

When Jesus was being wrongly arrested by the Romans, Peter took up a sword and cut off a soldier’s ear. Jesus responded, “Put your sword back into its place; for all those who take up the sword shall perish by the sword.” In compassion, Jesus healed the wounded soldier who had come to arrest him.

Wow! That’s a higher frequency that we should tune into our heart. Love overcoming hate.

As men of God, and students of history, Uncle M.L. and Daddy understood that violence begets violence. Violence is often borne of rage. And rage destroys – not only neighborhoods, but also lives. Rage is borne of hate. And hate does not seek the truth, but rather spawns victims. And victims seek other victims to make them suffer as they’ve suffered. Hurting people hurt people. And on and on and on souls fall towards a yawning abyss.

As Uncle M.L. Once wrote, violence is a descending spiral.

But inspired by 1 Corinthians 13, believing “Love never fails,” he also wrote, “darkness cannot drive out darkness and hatred cannot drive out hate. Only light can end the darkness, only love can drive out hate.”

My prayer is for the peace and healing of Ferguson, but also for the peace and healing of those who have recently lost loved ones – the families of Michael Brown, James Foley, my friend, those who have died at the hands of the abortion industry such as LaKisha Wilson and Tonya Reaves, and those who are victims of human trafficking, war, poverty, and other horrors of our fallen world.

My prayer is that we love truth; loving truth, that we seek it. Once finding the truth, that we seek justice. And once finding justice, we enjoy peace. As Uncle M.L. said, “true peace is not the absence of tension, but the presence of justice.”

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#knowpeaceknowjustice
#rachelweepingforherchildren
#heartsoftheparentsreturntochildren

Grieving, but believing, please join me in prayer for all of Ferguson as well as for all victims of violence who suffer in sterile hospital units, in darkened rooms, in abortion chambers, and by tear-drenched gravesites. We need repentance, forgiveness, and love. Let us seek them first.

Alveda King is the author of KING RULES, Founder of Alveda King Ministries and Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life. www.AfricanAmericanOutreach.com

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Dr. Alveda King Salutes MLK Congressional Gold Medal Honor; Remembers KING RULES

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

Martin and Coretta King

It is a blessing to pause today while on a book tour for the release of KING RULES to honor my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his wife Aunt Coretta, both recipients of a posthumous Congressional Gold Medal, awarded today during a special ceremony commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

I can’t join my cousins King Center CEO, Dr. Bernice A. King; Martin Luther King III and Dexter Scott King today as they join with Speaker John A. Boehner (R-OH), Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV), Senator Carl Levin (D-MI), Congressman John Lewis (D-GA), Congressional Black Caucus Chair Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH), and other Senate and House leaders as they join in commemorating this historic occasion. I extend my prayers and best wished for this august occasion.

Responding to the announcement that her parents would receive the Congressional Gold Medal, Bernice, said “We are deeply honored that my father and mother, Martin Luther King, Jr. and Coretta Scott King, are being given this award in recognition of their tireless and sacrificial leadership to advance freedom and justice through nonviolence in our nation. It is fitting that the award will be presented by the U.S. Congress as we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing of Civil Rights Act of 1964, which was a cornerstone reform on America’s journey to racial justice.”

For more than two centuries the Congressional Gold Medal has been one of the most distinguished honors bestowed by the Congress. Since 1776, the award has also been given to such diverse individuals as George Washington; Mother Theresa; Dorothy Height; Rosa Parks; Thomas Edison; Sen. Robert F. Kennedy; President Nelson Mandela; the Dalai Lama; Dr. Jonas Salk and many others.

This honor is fitting as it gives credence to the dream of not only Uncle ML and Aunt Coretta, but to our entire family. I believe that if they were here today, Uncle ML and Aunt Coretta would be happy that their family is proud of them.

In my book KING RULES, with my grandfather Daddy King, my father AD King and my Uncle MLK on the cover, I share memories of my uncle and our family. I too share the dream and in this 21st Century I pronounce – I too have a dream, that white people, and black people, all ethnic groups, all political wings, all human beings will unite in “The Beloved Community,” and honor the sanctity of all life, born and unborn.

I am blessed to know that there seems to be a new awakening across political lines that the sanctity of all life, marriage and family are called to a high yet not unreachable standard. For too long, there has been a great divide between America’s predominant political parties, confusing Civil Rights with moral preferences. It is encouraged to hear about progress for life and family across political lines.

It is with joy that I note a recent announcement from a democrat:

For example, African American Democrat Louisiana State Representative Katrina Jackson, the author of the state’s new law requiring abortionists to have local hospital admitting privileges, said in an interview, “The No. 1 genocide in the African-American community, and why we’re becoming a minority of minorities, is because most of our babies are dying in the womb from abortions.” She added, “I’m very passionate, especially when you’re looking at the African-American community, because those in the pro-choice community have been attempting to sell us on abortion being a way out for women who can’t afford to have their baby.”

It is time to break the chains.

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