Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King Jr’ Category

“My Uncle, Martin Luther King, Jr. Would Be Proud of our Supreme Court Case” Dr. Alveda King Comments on Priests for Life Challenge to #HHSMandate

Friday, November 13th, 2015


Date: November 13, 2015

Contact: Leslie Palma

NEW YORK — Dr. Alveda King, niece of Martin Luther King, Jr. and full-time Director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life, commented today on Priests for Life vs. HHS, a case that is one of seven that have just been accepted by the Supreme Court for review in the current term.

“I know that my father, Rev. A.D. King, and my Uncle, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would be proud to see my name on a lawsuit that seeks to protect freedom of religion,” Dr. King said. “I am taking this action on behalf of my daughters and granddaughters, all the young women I work with, and every American who refuses to be told how to practice their faith.”

Priests for Life was the fourth group to file a federal lawsuit against the HHS mandate, back in February 2012. The organization is represented by the American Freedom Law Center, and its lead attorneys Robert Muise and David Yerushalmi.

Also represented in the case, along with the Priests for Life organization itself, are Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director, and Janet Morana, Executive Director.

“I could not in good conscience provide access for my employees to the harmful products the mandate would require us to cover,” Mrs. Morana said. “My book, Recall Abortion, documents the harm so many have experienced.

“Moreover, the accommodation the Obama administration has come up with is no accommodation at all. I am opposing the mandate as an American who favors religious freedom, as a pro-life advocate whose organization exists precisely to protect human life, not take or harm it, and as a Catholic whose faith is unequivocal on these points.”

Priests for Life will host a press conference at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. For more information on the lawsuit, see

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit

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God’s Love Trumps Human Laws: Prayers for America and our World

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

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During reflections and prayers for our nation and our world, in the midst of all the domestic and global upheaval, we need to remember that God’s love and natural law trumps human nature and common law. #Godslovematters.

“Leave your fatherless children; I will keep them alive; and let your widows trust in me.” For thus says the Lord: “If those who did not deserve to drink the cup must drink it, will you go unpunished? You shall not go unpunished, but you must drink.” – Jeremiah 49:11-12 ESV

In the midst of Planned Parenthood scandals, Black Lives Matter furor, global religious wars and unrest, and so much turmoil everywhere, let’s turn to Acts 17:26 – of one blood we are one human race, and as such should love each other as brothers and sisters.

Please view links after reading MLK words below. For present day relevance please include [persons] wherever “men” are noted. Thank you.

“In the spirit of the founding fathers of our nation and in the spirit of the Declaration of Independence, I would like to use as a subject from which to preach: “The American Dream.”” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. July 4, 1965

“It wouldn’t take us long to discover the substance of that dream. It is found in those majestic words of the Declaration of Independence, words lifted to cosmic proportions: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by God, Creator, with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” This is a dream. It’s a great dream.

“The first saying we notice in this dream is an amazing universalism. It doesn’t say “some men,” it says “all men.” It doesn’t say “all white men,” it says “all men,” which includes black men. It does not say “all Gentiles,” it says “all men,” [persons] which includes Jews. It doesn’t say “all Protestants,” it says “all men,” which includes Catholics. (Yes, sir) It doesn’t even say “all theists and believers,” it says “all men,” which includes humanists and agnostics.

“Then that dream goes on to say another thing that ultimately distinguishes our nation and our form of government from any totalitarian system in the world. It says that each of us has certain basic rights that are neither derived from or conferred by the state. In order to discover where they came from, it is necessary to move back behind the dim mist of eternity. They are God-given, gifts from His hands. Never before in the history of the world has a sociopolitical document expressed in such profound, eloquent, and unequivocal language the dignity and the worth of human personality. The American dream reminds us, and we should think about it anew on this Independence Day, that every man [person] is an heir of the legacy of dignity and worth.” (After clicking on link, click on “full screen’ button for best viewing)

You might also enjoy this tribute to my Mother, Mrs. Naomi King.

And finally, “Let not your heart faint, and be not fearful at the report heard in the land, when a report comes in one year and afterward a report in another year, and violence is in the land, and ruler is against ruler.” – Jeremiah 51:46 ESV

Please pray for America.

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A Call for Peace On The Million Man Anniversary

Friday, October 16th, 2015

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It’s been 20 years since the Million Man March called Black men to Washington, DC for a “day of atonement.” The eyes of the world were on what for many was hoped to be the next great March on Washington, picking up on the dream MLK unwrapped in 1963.

So, last week, nearly 20 years later, Minister Louis Farrakhan, Pastor Jeremiah Wright and others again drew crowds to Washington, D.C., under the banner “justice or else.”

Or else what? And even better, we should all ask: “What’s next?

In an open letter to Pope Francis, I recently asked these questions:

Can a Gentile love a Jew? Can a Muslim love a Christian? Is a baby in the womb a person? What is the meaning of love? Is sin a dirty word? Do we have to be filthy rich to be happy? Can the Lion really lie down with the Lamb? The point is, how do we find peace?

In two decades, many have forgotten the goal of reconciliation and given over to implied threats. Not to make light of the frustrations beleaguering the African American community, our nation and indeed the world, we must continue to teach and live out nonviolent solutions to our problems.

For example, just last week, my mother suffered a violent carjacking attack while attempting entry into her gated community. In her own words, she “was not scared or angry” at her young attacker,” she was “frustrated by the misguided effort” to take her property using physical force. In an open letter, she encouraged him to seek Jesus and nonviolence in order to fulfill his destiny.

The very next day, my Pastor and mentor of 28 years, Allen McNair, founder of Believers’ Bible Christian Church passed away. During his lifetime, he taught and demonstrated that the best way to encourage, assist and transform “Black America,” our communities, our cities, the nation and the world is with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

My father, Rev. A.D. King; my grandfather, Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr.; and my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., stood at the forefront of the cause of basic human rights. In spite of horrible violence perpetrated against them and other African Americans, they held fast to the truth that “hate is too great a burden to bear.” They fought on a platform of love, the one power that can overcome hate.

One of the attendees in the crowd 20 years ago was Barack Obama. He became President.

Today, Dr. Ben Carson is s leading candidates to replace the President. What was unthinkable in terms of race relations for the early decades of my life is now not only acceptable, but the new norm.

The lasting impact of the King Family Legacy is that we seek the way to lasting progress and change through love, not hate. Uncle M. L. once wrote: “Bomb our homes and threaten our children, and as difficult as it is, we will still love you.”

Having survived the bombing of my family home in Birmingham, believe me, I understand the difficulty of what he said. Having lived through decades of enormous advances in harmony between blacks, whites, and others in this country, I understand the correctness of what he said.

His timeless appeal still works with profound and amazing success.

Love builds. Hate destroys.

What is also obvious, however, is that of late we have seen instances of terrible injustices committed against African American men by police officers. We have also seen for years the ongoing injustice of black-on-black crime, an occurrence of which my own mother experienced a few days ago. Our response to this violence, though, should not be to take action that destroys our neighborhoods or tears down our social structures.

Our response should always be to pursue positive change. We need not be passive – the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was anything but passive!

To be effective and have a lasting impact, our actions must be rooted in love and respect for all. To lash out may be immediately satisfying, but vengeance is not only futile, it’s contagious.

When I heard a speaker at this year’s “justice or else” event chanting, “Down, down, USA!” it saddened me terribly. Not only was this speaker destructive, she was just plain wrong.

As one who sincerely prays for the peace of Jerusalem, which would ultimately lead to reconciliation among the natural and spiritual sons of Abraham, I am concerned about the lack of peaceful negotiations among the factions.

Our nation faces many trials. As the Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, I’m particularly grieved by our trampling of the civil rights of the unborn. But the United States has proven over and over again that, having been founded on righteous principles, we can ultimately only achieve justice by lifting up those principles, not tearing them down.

As Americans, members of the human family of Acts17:26, let us begin to meet our challenges by recognizing that each one of us, regardless of our station in life or our stage of life, is entitled to respect. Let each one of us, regardless of our color or ethnicity or even religious understanding, show concern for each other’s wellbeing.

Most of all let us love one another. That was my uncle’s dream, our family’s dream. It’s still rooted in the American Dream today.

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They Had a Dream: The Legacy of Granddaddy King – Father of Martin Luther King

Friday, June 19th, 2015


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“Kevin has been a source of insight regarding the impact of and connection to abortion and the role of the father figure in the life of a little girl who grows up to become a mother. I hope that his blog will bless many with the same insight with which Kevin has blessed me.” – Dr. Alveda C. King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life

The King Family shared in a special way in the legacy of triumph and tragedy that marked the Civil Rights movement in the tumultuous decades of the 1950’s and 1960’s. It is widely known that their non-violent, prayerful resistance was a cornerstone of the strategy to dismantle the systemic structures of racism and violence that plagued so many African Americans. Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. and his brother A.D. King were very visible leaders of this movement. They embodied some of the best qualities of manly and fatherly leadership in their struggle for the civil rights of all Americans, especially the weakest and powerless in our society.

Where did these men find the courage and develop those Gospel-rooted values that led them to be such powerful advocates for the oppressed?

A lesser known part of the King Family legacy is the witness of Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. Many years before the Civil Rights movement and his son Martin’s famous “I have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963, Granddaddy King was already a strong advocate for the vulnerable and powerless. Thirteen years before that iconic speech in Washington D.C., Granddaddy King also had his own very special dream.

Dr. Alveda King is the daughter of A.D. King and Niece of Martin Luther King. Alveda gives us a glimpse into the heart and soul of her grandfather:

In 1950 my mother was pregnant with me and scared. She was looking for a doctor to perform a D&C abortion procedure. Granddaddy King told my mother:

“They (Planned Parenthood) are lying to you. That is not a lump of flesh. That’s my granddaughter. I saw her in a dream three years ago. She has bright skin and bright red hair and she’s going to bless many people.”

Research confirms that a father or grandfather’s reaction to an unplanned pregnancy is a significant influence on the mother’s decision to parent or abort the child.(1) Thankfully Granddaddy King stood up and defended the life of his unborn grandchild. Granddaddy and Alveda’s father promised to help her through that first unexpected pregnancy and Alveda was born to A. D. and Naomi Ruth Barber King on January 22, 1951. Over the years, Alveda’s mother recovered from her anger, finding grace in her relationship with Jesus Christ.

Years later the King family would lead millions of African Americans to great victories over the forces of racism. Granddaddy King’s famous sons would peacefully but powerfully advocate for the poor and oppressed African Americans whose civil rights, economic opportunity and God given dignity were being aborted by the institutionalized evil of racism.

Yet they also suffered a number of causalities. A.D. King died in a suspicious and tragic drowning accident a year after the assassination of his brother Martin Luther King. The death of Alveda’s father inflicted a deep wound on Alveda’s heart and soul at the same time the sexual revolution and abortion rights were in rapid ascent. Alveda shares:

During those years of my life, I made some scared and angry decisions, including having two of what was presented to me as “safe and legal abortions.” The first procedure was an involuntary abortion. The pro -abortion philosophy was empowering physicians to use their considerable influence to advocate for abortion. Sometimes they simply took matters in their own hands and boldly played God with vulnerable women and their unborn children.

Shortly before the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 I went to my doctor to ask why my monthly cycle had not resumed after the birth of my son. I did not ask for and did not want an abortion. The doctor said, “You certainly don’t need to be pregnant…let’s take a look.” He proceeded to perform a painful examination which resulted in a gush of blood and tissue emanating from my womb. He explained that he had performed a “local D and C.”

Sadly, the rise of pro abortion feminism was empowering men to embrace values that were radically different than those modeled by Granddaddy King and his famous sons. Rather than defending and protected the powerless entrusted to their care, men were being corrupted by the philosophy and practice of abortion rights and the rhetoric of choice.

Just a few short years after Martin Luther King was assassinated for his mission to protect and empower those oppressed by racism, black fathers were now participating in the death of their unborn black children; the same children that Dr Martin Luther King dreamed would one day live in a country “where children…will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” (Speech of MLK 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.)

Alveda: I never was able to process the trauma from that forced abortion. Soon after the Roe v. Wade decision, I became pregnant again. There was adverse pressure and threat of violence from the baby’s father now that abortion was legal and readily accessible. The ease and convenience provided through Roe v. Wade made it too easy for me to make the fateful and fatal decision to abort our child.

Granddaddy King saved Alveda’s life in 1950. Twenty-five years later he once again stood tall and reached out to Alveda, now reeling after 2 unresolved abortion losses, to pull back from the precipice of deeper death and destruction:

Alveda: Granddaddy MLK, Sr. rescued me again in 1975. He and my son’s father promised to help me if I wouldn’t abort my next baby. I believed them, thank God.

But Alveda would still suffer the after affects of her abortion losses. She shares about the Shockwaves of Abortion and their impact on her life and family:

Over the next few years, I experienced medical problems. I had trouble bonding with my son, and his five siblings who were born after the abortions. I began to suffer from eating disorders, depression, nightmares, sexual dysfunctions and a host of other issues related to the abortion that I chose to have. I felt angry about both abortions, and very guilty about the abortion I chose to have. The guilt made me very ill.

My children have all suffered from knowing that they have a brother or sister that their mother chose to abort. Often they ask if I ever thought about aborting them and have said, “You killed our baby.” This is very painful for all of us. Also, my mother and grandparents were very sad to know about the loss of the baby. The aborted child’s father also regrets the abortion. If it had not been for Roe v. Wade, I would never have had that abortion. Thankfully, through God’s merciful healing we continue to recover and heal as a family from the pain and loss of those abortion losses.

When you look at the sacrifice and legacy of the King family in their battle for racial equality and justice, it is truly an abomination for Planned Parenthood and other abortion advocates to spread the propaganda that abortion is a woman’s civil right. The struggle for civil rights for African Americans was a movement led by men and women who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice; they were ready to take a courageous stand and if necessary give their lives for those oppressed by racism and violence. Granddaddy King and his sons Martin Luther and A.D. King, and many other brave African American men embodied this model of manhood and fatherhood.

As we come to another Father’s Day celebration, let’s remember these men and emulate their values and sacrifice. Let us pray for those minority communities that have been especially targeted by abortion providers, and the fathers, mothers and families that have been devastated by the Shockwaves of Abortion.

“The Negro cannot win as long as he is willing to sacrifice the lives of his children for comfort and safety.”– Dr Martin Luther King
1. Aborted Women: Silent No More, David Reardon, Loyola University Press, Chicago, 1987

To read Alveda King’s testimony click HERE

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An Unplanned “PRAY IN” On My Birthday

Friday, January 30th, 2015

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Last week hundreds of thousands of pro-lifers descended on Washington for the March for Life on January 22, 2015, the anniversary of the court ruling of Roe vs. Wade which made it possible for millions of babies to be killed at the altar of “choice.”

150129 blog image6Every year the march is followed up by women and men of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign giving our testimonies of regretted abortions on the Supreme Court steps. This year there was even a former abortionist, Dr. Anthony Levatino, who regrets performing abortions.

150129 blog image1As I was sitting in front of the Supreme Court that day, my sixty-fourth birthday no less, the back and forth challenges between the pro-abortion protesters on one side and the pro-life marchers on the other side began to heat up. I began thinking of my uncle’s words, “We must learn to live together as brothers [and sisters] or perish as fools;” and I began to pray. As I prayed, I became grieved in my heart, and seemed to be lead by the Spirit of God to walk between the two groups and then lie down in the street with a sanctity of life sign and pray.

150129 blog image5As I walked towards the young people I watched pro-abortion protesters with their white pants splotched with red [paint] “blood” between their legs; some waving coat hangers and hurling profanity into the air, my heart ached and I felt moved to pray for them.

I also prayed for my Pro-Life brothers and sisters who rallied to answer the pro-abortion voices. I thought about God’s Love and how people, not knowing and understanding John 3:16, are perishing for lack of the knowledge of the Love of God.

150129 blog image8Somehow, the image of Dr. Billy Graham and my Uncle MLK preaching ad praying together against racism and segregation in the nineteen fifties fits in here. I’m praying that the racist roots of Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood will be broken.

However, I digress. The pro-abortion protesters were shouting for “reproductive rights” not seeming to understand that they were promoting death as a solution. Somehow, I just wanted to take them in my arms and lovingly explain to them, “Don’t you understand that every human person has the same right as you and me, the right to life? And that choice that you are fighting for is the choice to kill a tiny human person? And mothers and dads and everybody suffers from such choices?”

Alveda lying in street at SNMACThere was no room for my voice, there was so much shouting. So, I lay down on the ground and I quietly prayed for God to help us love each other and stop the killing.

Someone shouted, “get off of our property.” I thought about sitting up and explaining that we all had the constitutional right to be there; but I just kept on praying, oh Jesus!

Then, a young man looked down at me and shouted something like “who is that old *!@!#*! African American woman on the ground?” Someone said Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” He ran away into the crowd.

As the prolife marchers began to gather for the SILENT NO MORE rally, it was time to join #HealingTheShockwavesOfAbortion, so my colleagues pulled me up from the ground, and I walked over to the stage and gave testimony of my regretted abortions before the crowd. The voices of the pro-abortion protesters began to fade. Some were being arrested for acting out.

My “pray in” demonstration was unplanned; stirred by a heart of contrition and compassion. Yet, I will keep praying, whether standing, sitting, kneeling or from the ground, every year that the Lord permits me to and I will continue to pray for all humanity, not just until the day that we abolish abortion in America and around the world; but until God’s love breaks through the stony hearts and HIS glory is revealed.

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Alabama State University President Gwendolyn Boyd tells MLK audience: “Bring it on! We will not be silent!”

Tuesday, January 20th, 2015

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In a rousing invitation to take to social media with #alllivesmatter, and #ourchildrenmatter, the MLK service keynote speaker prompted my thoughts of #healingtheshockwavesofabortion.

150119 MLK Commemorative Service 017In a stirring “day on” of praise and worship to God, Elder Bernice King, daughter of MLK and Coretta Scott King, supported by her aunts, Christine King Farris and Naomi Ruth Barber King, other members of the extended King Family Legacy, King Center Board and staff, elected officials, Civil Rights Movement Foot Soldiers, celebrities, and communities from around the world, gave glory to God and lifted up the name of Jesus at the annual MLK Commemorative Service today.

“Bring it on!” This is the challenge Dr. Boyd took a regal “queenly” stance as she roared to the audience.

150119 MLK Commemorative Service 071Long time anointed Psalmist Sandi Patti brought us to our feet and tears to our eyes with her powerful rendition of HOW GREAT THOU ART.

150119 MLK Commemorative Service 064Mr. David Oyelowo who excellently portrayed MLK in Hollywood’s SELMA movie explained that God told him he would get the role.

Dr. Boyd affirmed Mr. Oyelowo’s award winning reenactment of MLK by saying that “no matter what the Oscars say,” his pristine performance of Dr. MLK was exceptional.

CEO Bernice King honored her parent’s brilliant vision of nonviolent social change, mentoring and activating youth to be culturally aware and forgiving which was stunningly revealed throughout the service, including a powerful rendition of MLK’s 1965 Voting Rights March speech directed by and led by Dr. MLK’s great niece, my cousin, Farris Christine Watkins.

The powerful liturgical dance, short and lengthy spoken tributes, rousing choral presentations and so much more were shared. We the audience were captured on the edge of our seats throughout, only to be continually brought to our feet in liberating bursts of joyful tears and jubilant applause.

150119 MLK Commemorative Service 102A couple of times, I was standing in the wings doing interviews; boots on the ground as it were. The last song, WE SHALL OVERCOME, with Father Frank Pavone as one of the song leaders, was of course “soul stirring.”

Everything was so empowering that we barely noticed the clock as the program spiraled past the allocated two hour mark. I almost missed my flight to Iowa to join Concerned Women of America for a RestoreTheDream2015 Rally.

I’ll be here in Iowa overnight. Then it’s off to DC for the National Prayer Service, MARCH FOR LIFE, and other Prolife events.

After that, a time with long time friend, brother and associate Walter Hoye of ISSUES4LIFE and the WALK FOR LIFE West Coast, and other prolife events will round off this year’s January PROLIFE tour. Once again, I’ll be spending my birthday, January 22, standing and praying for life from the road.

Love and blessings to all, from the road.

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Dr. Alveda King: SELMA Movie is Historically Entertaining

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

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Date: December 30, 2014

Contact: Leslie Palma

Atlanta, GA — In response to several social media and general inquiries regarding the new SELMA movie release, Dr. Alveda C. King, gospel evangelist, pro-life and civil rights activist shares the following:

“An invitation to a pre-release screening of the movie SELMA brought mixed emotions to my heart, and tears to my eyes. As I sat in the theater, I was transported back to the time when my Uncle MLK, my Daddy AD King and so many civil rights icons were embroiled in the historical crosshairs that brought equity to the voting rights of Blacks in America. It was during that same season that Daddy’s and Mother’s church parsonage was bombed in Birmingham; and the little girls, one a classmate of mine, were killed in the bombing of the church. It was also the season of my first civil rights march, a “Children’s March” where Daddy and James Orange and others taught me the tenants of nonviolent protests.

“Even though I wasn’t on the team of consultants who worked with the producers, I’m glad the film is in the atmosphere. While SELMA is historically informative and entertaining, having lived through those days, I would have appreciated more historical accuracy. I know that everyone can’t be included in such projects, but on a personal note, I was saddened to find no mention of my Dad, who not only marched in Selma, but was also felled (and recovered) along with not only John Lewis, but with many others, including Hosea Williams and my dearly departed friend James Orange.

“So many people have contacted me regarding the overtones regarding references to Uncle ML’s responses to the attacks on his personal life. I have only this to say. Like all of the Bible heroes, Uncle was a human being, an imperfect man who served a perfect God. He and Daddy are in Heaven now, in the company with David, Moses, Paul, Rahab, The Woman at the Well, The Woman caught in the act… Uncle ML was a devoted prophet and Man of God. Need I say more?

“Overall I enjoyed the film, and I recommend the film for viewing.”

Alveda is Author of King Rules, Founder of Alveda King Ministries, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, and spiritual advisor for Restore the Dream 2015.

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Priests for Life’s Alveda King to Speak at National Press Club Newsmaker Press Conference Jan. 7

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014


Date: December 30, 2014

Contact: Leslie Palma

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Dr. Alveda King, full-time director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life, daughter of civil rights activist Rev. A.D. King and niece of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., will discuss how her uncle and father would have viewed this generation’s struggle for civil rights during a National Press Club Newsmaker press conference Jan. 7 at 10 a.m. in the Zenger Room.

Dr. King will address gun violence, abortion and the war on poverty at the event, which comes one week before what would have been slain civil rights leader MLK’s 86th birthday,

The author of numerous books, Dr. King’s most recent, “King Rules” addresses what she sees as the nation’s need for “genuine servant leaders” to counter “the forces of moral drift and empty relativism.”

She previously served as a senior fellow at the conservative think-tank The Alexis de Tocqueville Institution and is a former member of Georgia’s House of Representatives.

Dr. King became a member of the Priests for Life pastoral team and director of its African-American Outreach after she met Father Frank Pavone, National Director, and the two of them shared their belief that the pro-life movement is the civil rights movement of the 21st century.

“The civil rights movement and the pro-life movement have the same heart and soul – the dignity and equality of every human life,” Father Pavone said. “Martin Luther King Jr. and his colleagues applied that truth to the evil of segregation. Today, pro-life activists apply that very same truth to the evil of abortion.”

Dr. King said she is honored and grateful to be asked to address Press Club members and D.C. journalists.

“My Uncle ML received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his non-violent campaign for human justice,” she said. “He resisted injustice and sought solutions through prayer and non-violent protest. I know if he could be with us, he would suggest those same paths to a peaceful solution to all the problems plaguing our society right now.”

The Newsmakers event is open to credentialed press and National Press Club members and is free of charge. No advance registration is required.

The National Press Club is at 529 14th St., NW. The Zenger Room is on the 13th floor.

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As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Niece, I Agree: Black Lives Matter

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

141202 blog imageThe recent grand jury decision in Ferguson, Missouri has launched a swarm of protests across the nation, declaring with signs and social media hashtags that #BlackLivesMatter. The tragic death of Michael Brown reminds us how many young men like him die far before their time. Ironically, Planned Parenthood—the nation’s largest abortion provider—was one of the many accounts that tweeted the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag, despite being responsible for the deaths of an estimated 100,000 black babies every year.

In reality, the cheapening of black lives does not begin in the teenage years. Even a century and a half after slavery and two generations after Jim Crow, black children are twice as likely as white children to be physically, emotionally or sexually abused. According to the Centers for Disease Control, black infants are more than twice as likely to die as white infants, and unborn black babies are five times as likely as white babies to be killed by abortion.

In cities like New York, black abortions now outnumber live births two to one. The catchall explanation for these shocking numbers is poverty. Black women are more likely to be unmarried and poor, and so we are told that abortion frees them from children they cannot afford to raise. This reasoning ignores the simple fact that out-of-wedlock births were far less common in the black community before Roe v. Wade made it illegal to restrict abortion at any stage of pregnancy. In short, blacks had far fewer babies out of wedlock before abortion became widely available. Why is this?

The reason is very simple. While the availability of free or heavily subsidized birth control, disease screening and abortion has increased exponentially over the past several decades, black behavior has changed for the worse. Although we are no longer legally second class citizens, far too many journalists, sociologists and even health professionals discuss our fertility and sexual behavior as if we are incapable of healthy choices and basic self-control. Clinics like those run by Planned Parenthood do not teach young women how to protect their bodies from abuse and disease. Instead, they promise to shield them from the consequences of their decisions, no matter how unhealthy or irresponsible.

Ten thousand free clinics cannot stem the tide of STD’s and abortions that inevitably accompany a deficit of self-respect. Despite making up just 12 percent of the population, according to the CDC blacks account for 47 percent of the new HIV diagnoses and nearly 70 percent of the new gonorrhea cases. The black rates of syphilis and chlamydia infection are ten times the rates among whites. All this despite hundreds of millions of federal dollars dedicated to disease screening and prevention.

And when black women seek medical care for unplanned pregnancies, they are overwhelmingly urged to abort. Whether they are teenagers, college students or young professionals, they are told that a baby will disrupt their education, spoil their career plans, and ruin their lives. Even married black women are five times as likely to abort as married white women. All this advice is based on the assumption that black babies are not worth what it costs to feed and clothe them, and that none of the millions of infertile couples would want them.

Online for Life and Priests for Life believe that babies of all races, socioeconomic backgrounds and family situations are valuable and have something special to offer our world that no one else does. We are committed to using cutting edge technology to reach and serve women facing unplanned pregnancies so that all babies will be welcomed into loving, stable homes.

Black lives DO matter, but if we are to teach our nation to value black life, we must start by valuing our own lives enough to make responsible, healthy decisions, and teaching our young people to do the same. If we want the rest of the world to value our children, we must value them first, beginning in the womb.

Martin Luther King, Jr. warned us, “The Negro cannot win if he is willing to sell the future of his children for his personal and immediate comfort and safety.” Is there a more shameless way to sell the future of our children than to deny them birth? The annual March for Life will be held on January 22, just three days after our nation celebrates Dr. King’s birthday. Join us as we march for black life and the future of all children in 2015.

Dean Nelson, Online for Life, and I co-authored this article.

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“Everything Has a Different “Why,” But the Results Still Make Me Cry.”

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

MLK“The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it….

“Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars.

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness:
only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”

“Strength to Love,” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 1963

A young man is shot dead by a policeman in Missouri. A photojournalist is horrendously executed by Islamists. A dear friend’s niece and her baby are killed and their bodies burned in a family dispute.

Three non-related events have touched me deeply in recent days, each having a different “why,” but each making me cry.

I am on my way to Ferguson, Missouri now. There is grief, anger, and uncertainty there. But also there, somewhere, is the truth of how and why Michael Brown died.

That truth will be revealed in time.

We yearn, of course, for immediate answers and swift justice. There can be no justice, though, without truth. And without peace, the search for truth becomes more difficult.

In some instances, such as what happened to James Foley at the hands of ISIS or my friend’s niece and her baby at the hands of a rage-driven relative, the truth is plain to see. No explanation could possibly justify what their killers did. We know who the wrongdoers are and whatever their rationales for their actions, those rationales are woefully insufficient.

In the case of Michael Brown, we have conflicting reports as to the events that led to his shooting. The jury is not in. Yet, rather than wait for the truth, some have acted from a deep-seated sense that they already know the truth. In the name of “justice,” some victims have inflicted great injustices on themselves and the collective by turning to violence. In their pain and anger, they have brought more harm than good.

Now, I’m not saying we shouldn’t have righteous anger at acts of oppression, hatred, or cruelty that are offenses before God. God’s Word teaches us, though, that we should be slow to anger. And we should be careful to distinguish human emotional outrage over an offense to ourselves versus an offense to God. God’s righteous anger is most powerful; seeking to restore righteousness, not trample upon it by committing more wrongs.

In my book KING RULES I write about how my uncle, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and my father, the Rev. Alfred Daniel Williams King, knew injustice. They, like millions of other African Americans, needed no introduction; injustice greeted them virtually every day of their lives. But they also knew peace in their hearts, the peace that surpasses all understanding. And from this peace, they sought and achieved a modicum of justice for the masses.

three headed monster Revised2Yet Ferguson teaches us that the dream is still lacking. Until we slay the three headed beast of racism, reproductive genocide and sexual perversion, we still have mountains to climb and to overcome.

We live in a corrupt world. Yet God’s Word teaches us not to repay evil with evil. Instead we must live to overcome evil with good.

When Jesus was being wrongly arrested by the Romans, Peter took up a sword and cut off a soldier’s ear. Jesus responded, “Put your sword back into its place; for all those who take up the sword shall perish by the sword.” In compassion, Jesus healed the wounded soldier who had come to arrest him.

Wow! That’s a higher frequency that we should tune into our heart. Love overcoming hate.

As men of God, and students of history, Uncle M.L. and Daddy understood that violence begets violence. Violence is often borne of rage. And rage destroys – not only neighborhoods, but also lives. Rage is borne of hate. And hate does not seek the truth, but rather spawns victims. And victims seek other victims to make them suffer as they’ve suffered. Hurting people hurt people. And on and on and on souls fall towards a yawning abyss.

As Uncle M.L. Once wrote, violence is a descending spiral.

But inspired by 1 Corinthians 13, believing “Love never fails,” he also wrote, “darkness cannot drive out darkness and hatred cannot drive out hate. Only light can end the darkness, only love can drive out hate.”

My prayer is for the peace and healing of Ferguson, but also for the peace and healing of those who have recently lost loved ones – the families of Michael Brown, James Foley, my friend, those who have died at the hands of the abortion industry such as LaKisha Wilson and Tonya Reaves, and those who are victims of human trafficking, war, poverty, and other horrors of our fallen world.

My prayer is that we love truth; loving truth, that we seek it. Once finding the truth, that we seek justice. And once finding justice, we enjoy peace. As Uncle M.L. said, “true peace is not the absence of tension, but the presence of justice.”

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Grieving, but believing, please join me in prayer for all of Ferguson as well as for all victims of violence who suffer in sterile hospital units, in darkened rooms, in abortion chambers, and by tear-drenched gravesites. We need repentance, forgiveness, and love. Let us seek them first.

Alveda King is the author of KING RULES, Founder of Alveda King Ministries and Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life.

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