Archive for the ‘MLK’ Category

Fr. Pavone and Alveda King to take part in March on Washington commemoration

Monday, August 26th, 2013





Priests for Life

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: August 26, 2013

Contact: Eugene Vigil
347-286-7277

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Father Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, will join Dr. Alveda King, Director of African-American Outreach, in commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and her uncle Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

Father Pavone will take part in an interfaith service from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 28, at Shiloh Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. and will be present with the King family for the events throughout the day.

“We remember the events of 50 years ago because they speak to today, and the message that the march and the speech have for America is that we cannot have equality and justice until the children in the womb are protected,” said Father Pavone. “Dr. King’s dream would be absolutely unintelligible if one imagines that somehow the dismemberment and decapitation of thousands of children a day could be reconciled with that dream, or could be justified either morally or legally.”

Dr. Alveda King noted that her uncle often spoke of a “Beloved Community.” Father Pavone, Dr. Alveda King, her mother and brother are among the signatories of a 2011 declaration called “The Beloved Community and the Unborn” that draws on a Christmas sermon Martin Luther King delivered in 1967, in which he preached the following words:

“The next thing we must be concerned about if we are to have peace on earth and good will toward men is the nonviolent affirmation of the sacredness of all human life. . . When we truly believe in the sacredness of human personality, we won’t exploit people, we won’t trample over people with the iron feet of oppression, we won’t kill anybody.”

The statement, which calls on America to include the unborn in the Beloved Community, was placed in the time capsule underneath the new monument to Dr. King in Washington, DC.
“Nonviolence is not nonviolence if we still tolerate some violence,” Father Pavone said, “And equality is not equality if some are still not equal. Let the events of these days kindle in us all, from the President to the newest citizen, a determination to bring an end to abortion, and restore justice for the unborn.”

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit www.priestsforlife.org.






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Alveda, Father Frank to join 50th Celebration

Friday, August 23rd, 2013





MLK March on Washington

Father Frank and I will attend 8/28 celebration for 50 years after March on Washington and I Have a Dream speech.

Fifty years ago, a valiant group of people from across America and around the globe embarked on a “March on Washington.” While there have been many marches on Washington possibly before and certainly afterwards, the 1963 March on Washington remains the premier example of how unity of heart and spirit can transform a community, a nation and a world.

My parents, A.D. and Naomi King attended the March, and were there when their famous brother/brother-in-law delivered the now famous I HAVE A DREAM speech. Back then, they were marching for jobs, decent housing and decent education. Of course, then as well as now, jobs, housing and education remain in the category of issues that impact all human beings from a common perspective. After all, everyone needs some form of income to provide food and shelter, and we all need some form of intellectual enlightenment.

Fifty years later, the March has taken on a different flavor, and is more cause oriented than the counterpart of days gone by. The 2013 March includes themes that go beyond those basic demands of 1963. History teaches us that causes can divide people while Agape Love can unite. During his lifetime, my Uncle M. L. spoke of a dream, he spoke of a “Beloved Community.”

For the last several days, people have tempted me to delve into the political melee about who is right about one cause or another. Yet, I still cling to the hope that Agape Love will take the place of political and moral turpitude, and that people will rise above debates about tolerance and reach rather for compassion and transformation.

I will join the hundreds of thousands in DC over the next few days. I’m asking you to join us, and if you can’t come, please pray with us. Some of the upcoming events promise to be exciting and soul stirring. As my cousin Bernice says:

“The response to our call to commemorate the March on Washington and my father’s “I Have a Dream” speech has been overwhelming,” said King Center C.E.O. Bernice A. King, a convener of the nation-wide and global mobilization. “Our coalition has organized a wonderful, diverse program, which begins in Atlanta, continues for 8 days in Washington, D.C. and culminates with a global bell-ringing. We expect hundreds of thousands of people to join us in the nation’s capitol for this historic event, and many more to take part world-wide in their communities.”

On Sunday, August 25th The King Center will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech by participating in a gospel brunch sponsored by the InterContinental Hotels & Resorts at 11:30 a.m. in the grand ballroom of the Willard InterContinental, 1401 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington D.C. Dr. King put the finishing touches on his famous speech in his suite at the Willard Hotel the night before the pivotal August 28, 1963 March on Washington civil rights rally.

On Tuesday, August 27th the King Center will co-host the K-12th Grade Educational Initiative at the “School Without Walls,” a Washington, D.C. public school. The event is for students, but the public is invited to stream the program from http://officialmlkdream50.com/. My mother, Mrs. Naomi King and my cousin Dr. Angela Farris Watkins are slated to speak at the forum that day.

The King Center, along with the National Park Service and others, is co-sponsoring a full day of activities on August 28th, the actual anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington and Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. There will be an Interfaith Service at Shiloh Baptist Church, 1500 9th Street, NW, Washington, DC from 8:30 (prelude) to 10:30 a.m. that will include a variety of religious disciplines.

That afternoon there will be a “Let Freedom Ring Call to Action and Commemoration Ceremony” from 11:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C will feature remarks from President Obama, former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, the King Family, elected officials, international dignitaries, celebrities, youth and leaders from national and international organizations. The program is global in nature and will include performances by a Haka Team from New Zealand and Junkanoo Performers from the Bahamas. Confirmed program participants include: Kid President, Jaime Fox, Peter and Paul, Hill Harper, Soledad O’Brien, Lynda Johnson Robb, Bebe Winans Shirley Caesar, Heather Headley and others to be announced. A song I wrote, “Let Freedom Ring” will also be performed that day. For more details, go to http://officialmlkdream50.com/.

Bernice says that her father’s call to “Let Freedom Ring” in his speech will be answered with programs and bell-ringing ceremonies across the nation on August 28th at 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. In addition to the diverse activities scheduled for Washington, D.C., programs celebrating the ’63 March and Dr. King’s dream with bell-ringing ceremonies have thus far been scheduled in places as diverse as: Montgomery, Alabama; Little Rock, Arkansas; Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado; Stone Mountain, Roswell, Rome and Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Topeka, Kansas; Louisville, Kentucky; Boston, Massachusetts; Chaska Minnesota; Tougaloo College, Jackson, Greenwood and Columbus, Mississippi; Jefferson City, Missouri; Amherst, Concord, Isles of Shoals, Nashua, North Conway, Pelham and Mt. Washington, New Hampshire; New York, New York; Delaware and Grandville, Ohio; Allentown, Lafayette College and Allegheny College, Pennsylvania; Nyack, New York; Lookout Mountain, Tennessee; Austin, Houston and Dallas, Texas; Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont; and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, with more being added every day.

Bell-ringing programs will take place outside the U.S. at 3:00 p.m. in their respective time zones in locations as diverse as: Kathmandu, Nepal; Lutry and Montreaux, Switzerland; Monrovia, Liberia; London, U.K.; and Tokyo, Japan.

In my heart of hearts I truly believe that we all long to be “free at last.” I’m not sure how many remember the rest of the phrase from that speech delivered so long ago: “Thank God Almighty, we’re free at last.” As we approach the March and the Bell Ringing Ceremony, let us pray for each other, and love one another so that we can ascend above the looming abyss that threatens to reach that higher ground.






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EXCITEMENT BUILDS FOR COMMEMORATION OF 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MARCH ON WASHINGTON, MLK’S “I HAVE A DREAM” SPEECH

Friday, August 16th, 2013





MLK_I_Have_A_Dream,,,

FOR IMMEDIAT RELEASE
August 12, 2013

Media Contact: Bunnie Jackson-Ransom (404) 505-8188
King Center Contact: Steve Klein (404) 526-8944

Dozens of Cities Plan for World-wide ‘Let Freedom Ring’ Celebration

ATLANTA: As part of the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, The King Center announced expanded details for the observance of this historic milestone.

“The response to our call to commemorate the March on Washington and my father’s “I Have a Dream” speech has been overwhelming,” said King Center C.E.O. Bernice A. King, a convener of the nation-wide and global mobilization. “Our coalition has organized a wonderful, diverse program, which begins in Atlanta, continues for 8 days in Washington, D.C. and culminates with a global bell-ringing. We expect hundreds of thousands of people to join us in the nation’s capitol for this historic event, and many more to take part world-wide in their communities.”

The King Center, along with the National Park Service and others, is co-sponsoring a full day of activities on August 28th, the actual anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington and Dr. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. There will be an Interfaith Service at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, DC from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. that will include a variety of religious disciplines.

That afternoon there will be a “Let Freedom Ring Call to Action and Commemoration Ceremony” from 11:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C will feature remarks from President Obama, former Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, the King Family, elected officials, international dignitaries, celebrities, youth and leaders from national and international organizations. The program is global in nature and will include performances by a Haka Team from New Zealand and Junkanoo Performers from the Bahamas. Confirmed program participants include: Kid President, Jaime Fox, Peter and Paul, Hill Harper, Soledad O’Brien, Lynda Johnson Robb, Bebe Winans and others to be announced. For more details, go to http://officialmlkdream50.com/.

Ms. King said that her father’s call to “Let Freedom Ring” in his speech will be answered with programs and bell-ringing ceremonies across the nation on August 28th at 3:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. In addition to the diverse activities scheduled for Washington, D.C., programs celebrating the ’63 March and Dr. King’s dream with bell-ringing ceremonies have thus far been scheduled in places as diverse as: Montgomery, Alabama; Little Rock, Arkansas; Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado; Stone Mountain, Roswell, Rome and Atlanta, Georgia; Honolulu, Hawaii; Topeka, Kansas; Louisville, Kentucky; Boston, Massachusetts; Chaska Minnesota; Tougaloo College, Jackson, Greenwood and Columbus, Mississippi; Jefferson City, Missouri; Amherst, Concord, Isles of Shoals, Nashua, North Conway, Pelham and Mt. Washington, New Hampshire; New York, New York; Delaware and Grandville, Ohio; Allentown, Lafayette College and Allegheny College, Pennsylvania; Nyack, New York; Lookout Mountain, Tennessee; Austin, Houston and Dallas, Texas; Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont; and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, with more being added every day.

Bell-ringing programs will take place outside the U.S. at 3:00 p.m. in their respective time zones in locations as diverse as: Kathmandu, Nepal; Lutry and Montreaux, Switzerland; Monrovia, Liberia; London, U.K.; and Tokyo, Japan.

Other events commemorating the 50th Anniversary include:

The first King Center observance of the 50th anniversary begins on Saturday, August 17th from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m at The King Center and National Historic site, Atlanta, GA. The King Center, in cooperation with the Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site, Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta Public Schools, the City of Atlanta, Operation Hope and others, will present the Atlanta Global Freedom Exposition to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. King’s historic “I Have a Dream” speech. The program will provide a unique, family-friendly opportunity to participate in honoring Dr. King’s great dream for our nation and world in the community where he was nurtured,” explained Superintendent Forte. The event is open to the public, free of charge.

On Tuesday, August 27th the King Center will co-host the K-12th Grade Educational Initiative at the “School Without Walls,” a Washington, D.C. public school. The event is for students, but the public is invited to stream the program from http://officialmlkdream50.com/.

On Sunday, August 25th The King Center will celebrate the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech by participating in a gospel brunch sponsored by the InterContinental Hotels & Resorts at 11:30 a.m. in the grand ballroom of the Willard InterContinental, 1401 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington D.C. Dr. King put the finishing touches on his famous speech in his suite at the Willard Hotel the night before the pivotal August 28, 1963 March on Washington civil rights rally.

For more information about nationwide and global bell-ringing programs on August 28th, please contact Steve Klein at sklein@thekingcenter.org. To see a video clip of Bernice A. King inviting people and organizations to participate in the commemorative bell-ringing, please scan the QR Code below with your cell phone laser-reader app.

The theme for the commemoration of the March on Washington and the “I Have A Dream” speech, “Our World, His Dream: Freedom – Make it Happen,” has been endorsed and supported by the 50th Anniversary Coalition for Jobs, Justice and Freedom. The theme is undergirded by the three sub-themes: “Freedom to Prosper in Life;” “Freedom to Peacefully Co-Exist;” and “Freedom to Participate in Government.”

For more information about the 50th Anniversary of the I Have A Dream speech, please contact The King Center (Atlanta, GA) at 404-526-8944, sklein@thekingcenter.org or visit the website www.mlkdream50.com. To stay in touch with updated details, participate with the following: Twitter twitter.com/DCMARCHMLK50; Facebook www.facebook.com/Mlkdream50; Pinterest pinterest.com/mlkdream50/; and Intstagram mlkdream50. The Hashtag is #mlkdream50.

Media Contact:
For more information, please contact Bunnie Jackson-Ransom at (404) 505-8188 or email
First Class, Inc. bjr@fclassinc.com and/or staff@fclassinc.com.






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Martin/Zimmerman Dilemma: Would MLK Boycott?

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013





130730 blog image

In light of all of the discussions occurring now about boycotting the state of Florida because of the unrest over the Martin/Zimmerman verdict, I believe that certainly it is appropriate to express, in a peaceful and non-violent manner, the concerns that are being raised.

In regards to the 1960s, people are asking me would this Florida boycott have been an appropriate target back then? Certainly in the 20th Century, boycotts were the order of that day, so possibly yes, that could have happened back then. Of course cannot say whether Martin Luther King, Jr. would have led such a march since he’s not here, but according to his own words, we can believe that he would have opposed stereotyping and profiling. Yet we can also believe he would be calling for peaceful nonviolent resolution as well as reconciliation of the one human race.

We who engage in nonviolent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive.
– “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” April 16, 1963

I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant.
– Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech,

Along these lines there is a movement that is occurring at the same time as the Florida boycott and that is the reconciliation rallies led by people of good will of every ethnic group rising up in Florida at this time.

Charisma Magazine’s Steve Strang one of the organizers of the Restoration Meetings had this to say in a recent column:

“The George Zimmerman acquittal a week ago has brought to the surface racial divides in our country, and it’s time for believers in Jesus to get involved because the best answers are spiritual, available to us through fervent prayer. There must be forgiveness, and mercy always triumphs over justice.”

The organizers are planning on taking those reconciliation rallies across the country saying, pretty much, that mercy overrides human judgment.

We know that the judgment that acquitted George Zimmerman was man’s judgment based on man’s law, the stand your ground law. Admittedly, there are some problems with that law. However, God’s justice does contain mercy. We are required to do justice, love mercy, and to walk upright and humbly before God.

So I’m asking that there be a reconciliation message for Florida and for the country that we must reconcile as one blood, one human race. Truly we are one human race, and indeed we can be brothers and sisters and not combat and fight each other and kill each other.

We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.
– MLK Speech in St. Louis, Missouri, March 22, 1964

This nation needs healing. It needs a message of reconciliation. As a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, I am appealing to all concerned to please consider reconciliation as a major part of the message that must be delivered.

Now, does there need to be justice for Trayvon? I happen to believe there should be. What form will that justice take? The answer has yet to be revealed.

I was truly saddened to hear that some have besmirched the memory of Trayvon by relegating him to the category of being labeled a thug with the implication that he deserved to be dead. Our children have a right to be born, to dream and to see their dreams come true. When they get off track, they should be firmly yet lovingly corrected. If we teach them and love them, they can live and not die!

This is a very tragic situation. Trayvon’s dreams went to his grave with him. I’m praying that God will have the final word on all of this.

I’m praying for the Martins. I’m praying for the Zimmermans. I’m praying for all concerned.

Reconciliation is in order!

Many celebrity protestors are quietly pro-life. It would be good if they would speak to sanctity of life from conception till natural death in their efforts. Finally, in every conflict let us strongly urge repentance, forgiveness and Reconciliation over Boycotts.

Just in case you haven’t heard any celebrity prolife messages, check out Nick Cannon, Fred Hammond and Flipsyde.






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Dr. Alveda C. King: Judge by Content of Character, not Skin Color or Hoodies

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013





MLK in Hoodie

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 17, 2013

Contact: Leslie Palma
Leslie@priestsforlife.org
(347) 286-7277

While I salute the passion and creativity of artist Nikkolas Smith in reference to the image of MLK wearing a hoodie, I feel compelled to cry “foul, shame on you” to the media moguls and civil rights legends who want to stir up a controversy where there is none. I am not angered by the artistic expression. I am just plain hurt and saddened to see the message of my uncle Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. reduced to a debate over an article of clothing. I would love to talk with artist Nikkolas about my uncle.

“Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will.”
– Martin Luther King, Jr. “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” April 16, 1963

My grandfather was always a meticulously dressed and well groomed man. He encouraged and actually insisted that his family follow his lead, because he was grooming us all to represent Jesus, our family and our community. Uncle M. L. and Daddy grew up to become leaders and did their best to honor and respect their father’s teachings. Like all humans, they sometimes fell short, but not for lack of trying.

I am no way suggesting that hoodies are a bad thing. The young folks in my family wear them. They are actually handy o\in the rain. Yet there are other ways to remember Dr. King. Perhaps most importantly that way would be found in his sermons and letters.

“We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”
– Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Speech in St. Louis, Missouri, March 22, 1964

As to the controversy, George Zimmerman seemingly never explored the content of Trayvon Martin’s character. Rather he identified and profiled Travon Martin according to Trayvon’s choice of attire which was a hoodie. We as African-Americans should never be racially profiled. We must advocate as Martin Luther King, Jr. advocated; for defining ourselves by the content of our character rather than according to the color of our skin or choice of attire. This should be the standard for every ethnic group, every family and every individual.

Unfortunately, the trial was about finding reasonable doubt in a murder case; as to what happened the night Zimmerman shot Trayvon. Reasonable doubt was established, and thus human justice was served in a human court of law. Yet, was everyone so concerned about serving man’s legal system that we forgot to serve God?

Sadly, the legal aspects of the trial were not about whether or not George Zimmerman racially profiled Trayvon Martin. That issue now becomes a matter of civil rather than criminal law. The criminal legal process was not about hoodies and candy. It wasn’t even about smoking marijuana. By the way, two United States Presidents admit to having smoked marijuana as young men, one says he inhaled and one says he didn’t.

This leads me to wonder what kind of man Trayvon Martin would have become if he had been allowed to live.

By observing his parents during the time of his tragic and fatal shooting and this trial, I am sure that Trayvon would have turned out just fine. His parents have called for justice and peace during their suffering and loss throughout this entire ordeal. My prayers continue to go out to them.

In the final analysis, Trayvon Martin represented humanity, life and purpose as ordained by God for all persons, in and out of the womb; and he deserved not to be profiled; but rather regarded as a precious soul.

Trayvon wore a hoodie not because he was black, but because it was his choice of style for teens in this time in our society. His clothing should never have been a factor in defining him.

As Martin Luther King, Jr. was called to greatness, you, I and yes Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman were called to greatness, purpose and the right to live in America. The difference is that MLK lived long enough to answer his call.

Trayvon was killed before he could live out his call and dream, which is buried with him. George Zimmerman made a decision that has changed his life as well.

Every human being is part of the one single human race. We are one blood; One race. We are Created with a dream inside, and when we are allowed to be born and to live out our God ordained lives, we have a chance to be great.

Would Martin Luther King, Jr. as a teenager wear a hoodie in the 21st Century? I may not think so, but who knows. Would Martin Luther King, Jr. weep at the tragic loss of the life and dream of Trayvon Martin, and the now deferred dream of George Zimmerman? Most likely.






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Dr. Alveda King Remembers the “Letter from a Birmingham Jail”

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013





mlk-in-birmingham-jail

On this, the 50th anniversary of the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.’s famous Letter from a Birmingham Jail, his niece, Dr. Alveda King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, says her uncle’s letter applies just as profoundly today to abortion as it did in 1963 to segregation.

Alveda is joined by Father Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life who today said: “Today, that letter still speaks. Just as it spoke in his day on behalf of those who suffered the violence of segregation, so now it speaks for those who suffer the violence of abortion.”

Alveda adds, “If Uncle M.L. were alive today, he would surely include the 21st century womb babies and their mothers in his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” The atrocity of abortion in America has killed millions of human babies who are often considered to be property, chattels, and less than human.

“In his 1963 letter, he wrote that segregation ‘ends up relegating persons to the status of things.’ Change ‘segregation’ to ‘abortion’ and you have the year 2013.

“Jim Crow laws gave us the continuing dehumanization of African Americans, beatings, lynchings, and the Ku Klux Klan. Roe v. Wade has given us the dehumanization of unborn and, now, born babies, skull crushings, spine snippings. Consider Kermit Gosnell in Philadelphia; the Planned Parenthood Chicago facility that killed Tonya Reaves; and all of the other hundreds of abortion providers and Planned Parenthood officials who can’t say whether fully born babies who survive abortions should be helped to live.

“In the Letter from a Birmingham Jail, Uncle M. L. noted that by their effort and example, early Christians ‘brought an end to such evils as infanticide’ in the Greco-Roman world. We now know, however, that the Greco-Roman world has been revived in abortion clinics across the land. Where the ancients would leave their unwanted babies to die of exposure, abortionists now leave their ‘mistakes’ to die in corners or closets – or worse.

My Uncle M.L. once wrote in 1953 that the most segregated hour in America is 11:00 am on Sunday because back then Blacks and Whites didn’t often worship together.

Fast forward to 2013, where minority mothers and our babies are targeted by abortion providers as the most vulnerable recipients of abortion in the name of women’s rights and solutions to poverty. Even Gosnell, whose defense lawyer said if women want Mayo Clinic standards they should go to Mayo Clinic, yes, even Gosnell’s House of Horrors had a slightly cleaner “White Only” surgical room, while Black women and their babies were butchered in a torture chamber in another section of the abortion mill. All the while, they all keep trying to hide the fact that all abortions are dangerous to a woman’s health, her baby’s life, and generally result in death and misery.

This all leads me to say that the most segregated place a woman can go today is an abortion mill! And no ludicrous references to a 1966 deceptive Planned Parenthood Award offered to MLK and accepted by his wife, not him, is going to trick people into believing that my uncle would condone slaughtering babies and damaging their mothers in the name of justice.

“Uncle M. L. even once asked: ‘How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: ‘An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The Reverend King was a man of God and a preacher of the Word. He sought a peace that was not just the absence of tension, but the presence of justice. He would agree that there can be no real peace in a society that tolerates injustice. He would most certainly agree that the taking of innocent lives is a horrible injustice. There is no doubt that just as my Uncle M.L. called America’s clergy to awaken 50 years ago to the moral transgression of segregation, he would today sound out a call for a moral awakening and urge all Americans and indeed all human beings around the world today to awaken to the grievous wrong of abortion, and the subsequent devastation of natural marriage and family.”






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Remembering Uncle M. L.: Alveda King reflects on the death of the Dreamer

Thursday, April 4th, 2013





MLK Collage

Forty-five years ago today, my Uncle M.L., the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered by an assassin’s bullet. Sometimes I wonder what life would be like if that shot had never been fired; what our nation would be like if that bullet had missed. Many are the times I wish he were here.

But though Uncle M.L. is no longer with us on earth, his voice lives on in the words he used to change our nation in the cause of justice.

We are a more just society today because of Martin Luther King, Jr. Not because he brought new ideas into the public consciousness, but because he reminded us of fundamental, eternal truths – truths that needed to be restated and lived out. He once asked and answered this question: “How does one determine whether a law is just or unjust?” He went on to explain:

“A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: ‘An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

These timeless truths must be restated again today.

Remember Reverend Martin Luther King – let us not forget that he was an ordained Baptist minister and preacher of the Word of God – taught that we are to respect the law. But he also taught that there is a law higher than man’s. There are no commands more deserving of obedience than God’s.

Those commands caused Uncle M. L. to look beyond city ordinances, state statutes, or even federal law for guidance. He believed that those ordinances, statutes, and laws were to be respected, but that they were to be weighed against God’s law or what some would term natural law to determine if they were just.

The same is true today. But some still look to themselves to determine right and wrong.

We are told by the Obama administration that it is “unjust” that women should have to buy their own birth control pills, so everyone else must reach into their pockets to pay for them.

We are told by abortion advocates that it is “unjust” that some women cannot afford to abort their babies, so tax dollars must be used to finance the killing of those children.

We are told by same-sex “marriage” advocates that it is “unjust” that men cannot marry other men and women cannot marry other women, so 2,000 years of wisdom must be abandoned.

And yet, the Bible tells us that human life is sacred. We are thereby to choose life over abortion. The Bible teaches us that natural marriage between one man and one woman is part of the procreative process. We are thereby compelled to choose holy and procreative matrimony.

In forgetting our heritage, in distancing ourselves from God’s moral rules, we are doing Uncle M. L. a disservice, and we are in danger of coming face to face with disaster. So, in remembering Uncle M. L. today, I urge America and the world to remember that he was a servant of God who, though imperfect, tried to point people to the truth.






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Pro-Life Leaders Will Hold Press Conference Concerning Gosnell Murder Trial Developments

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013





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I’m in Atlanta with family preparing to commemorate April 4 memorial to MLK death, while my friends Rev. Clenard Childress and THE VISION co-host Dr. Day Gardner are in Philadelphia reporting on the Kermit Gosnell trial that the mainstream media is virtually ignoring. They know that coverage of this trial would expose how horrific and unjust abortion really is. We all need to work together to make sure that all life affirming laws are just and moral laws. Then they are to be enforced and upheld. Finally, more life affirming laws must be passed.

As my Uncle ML once said, “A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of St. Thomas Aquinas: An unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal law and natural law.”

Roe v. Wade is as unjust as they get. We need to reverse it if we are to ever expect our “prayer” of “God bless America” to ever be answered. It’s said so often at the end of political speeches while those saying it vote for unjust laws. It doesn’t make any sense.

Please share the information about the press conference and ask your local papers and stations to cover it.

Press Release

Contact: Troy Newman, President, 316-841-1700
Cheryl Sullenger, Senior Policy Advisor, 316-516-3034,
info.operationrescue@gmail.com; both with Operation Rescue

PHILADELPHIA, April 3, 2013 /Christian Newswire/ — A press conference will be held by Dr. Day Gardner of the National Black Pro-Life Union, Rev. Dr. Clenard Childress, Jr., Founder of BlackGenocide.org, Cheryl Sullenger of Operation Rescue, and others on Thursday, April 4, to comment on the latest developments in the Kermit Gosnell murder trial. Dr. Gardner and Mrs. Sullenger have attended the trial this week.

Gosnell is accused of the first degree murder of seven live newborns by snipping their spinal cords with scissors and the third degree murder of abortion patient Karnamaya Mongar at his “House of Horrors” abortion clinic in West Philadelphia.

Press Conference Details

When: Thursday, April 4, 2013 at Noon
Where: The Juanita Kidd Stout Center for Criminal Justice
1301 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107
Why: Comment on the Kermit Gosnell murder trial

Day GardnerDr. Day Gardner is the founder and President of The National Black Pro Life Union, Associate Director of National Pro Life Center on Capitol Hill and an executive member of the National Clergy Council. She made history when, as Miss Delaware, she became the first black woman to be named as a semi-finalist of the internationally renowned Miss America Pageant, breaking through numerous racial and stereotypical roadblocks for others to follow. She is an outspoken advocate on life issues.

Rev. Clenard ChildressRev. Dr. Clenard Childress, Jr. is a noted community activist, author, and speaker. In 2002, he birthed the Pro-life website Blackgenocide.org. This website was designed to reach the Afro-American Community with the truth about abortion. Pastor Childress is also a member of the National Pro-Life Religious Council of Washington, DC.

cherylsullenger-spaCheryl Sullenger is Senior Policy Advisor for Operation Rescue who writes extensively on abortion abuses. Her complaints filed against abortionists around the nation have brought to light the illegal activity and substandard practices that are pervasive throughout the abortion industry.

“The Gosnell trial is exposing the shoddy nature of the abortion cartel like never before and the shocking truth of how the black community is particularly targeted for abortion. While not every clinic duplicates Gosnell’s ‘house of horrors,’ there are aspects of his appalling practices present in nearly every abortion clinic in the country,” said Sullenger.

Operation Rescue is one of the leading pro-life Christian activist organizations in the nation and has become a strong voice for the pro-life movement in America.






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Birthday Message

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013





MLK  Tribute Book

I’m 62 years and 9 months old today. Read about my Granddaddy’ vision and my miracle birth HERE

Also check out King Family baby pictures in our new book HERE or HERE

Thanks be to God. “This is the day that The Lord has made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it.”






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Pro-life Concerns Mentioned at King Memorial

Monday, January 21st, 2013





Priests for Life

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: January 21, 2013

Contact: Leslie Palma
347-286-7277

ATLANTA, GA. — Having just returned from the 45th Martin Luther King, Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, issued the following statement:

“I was pleased to join with the King family once again today in honoring the memory and recommitting ourselves to the Dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. In particular, Elder Bernice King, Martin’s daughter, made reference to the fact that Dr. King was not just speaking for the Negro, but ‘for all marginalized people,’ and she referred to the need to affirm the ‘personhood’ of all.

“The keynote speaker, Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, President of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference, made this even more explicit when he said that living out the dream of Dr. King, and seeking justice, require that we end violence ‘in and outside the womb’ and that part of the cry of justice today is to ‘defend life.’

“On this holiday in honor of Dr. King, I want to again bring attention to the statement, The Beloved Community and the Unborn, signed by several members of the King family. And on this eve of the completion of 40 years since Roe vs. Wade, may we all recommit ourselves to the dream that one day our unborn brothers and sisters will be able to say, Free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit www.priestsforlife.org.






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