Archive for the ‘Slavery’ Category

The New Civil War: Abortion

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

Civil Righs Begin in the Womb

The ongoing epic saga of the battle for Civil Rights has gained a boost from African American activist sans poet Shawn Welcome. He has posted a video on YouTube of his work, “Stand4Life Promo (Shawn Welcome – Civil War)”

“Bayonets in my neighbors’ neck if they’re close enough, gun-smoke and tensions in the air, this won’t end for another four years. The American Civil War, a bloody conflict within the same nation. On the backs of Blacks was built the wealthiest…” he laments, “Slave ships were packed and hearts were hardened, never asked to be here how unfair that we’re the problem…“

Welcome continues: “Never asked to be here, how unfair that they’re the problem,” he says as he moves his hand in cradle formation near his stomach alluding to the unborn babies in America.
“All in the name of freedom. Party like a rock-star while little ones are dying.

“Silent screams from injected saline and dreams you will never hear because little lungs were punctured before they could fully function,

WHO WILL BE A VOICE FOR THE VOICELESS?” he cries out,

“How many freight trains of injustice will roll by behind church buildings while service inside sings louder?

“Hands in the air, pump up the volume…drowning out the rumblings of oppression.

“No formal funerals, nor miniature caskets, only the likes of medical waste to management tell me “how many pounds of flesh do you pick up for profit?

He continues with an eerie and compelling question: “And when will that “waste” begin to weigh down on your conscience?”

Play this video to hear the rest.

Now, do something to help end abortion, please SHARE the video with all your friends and family.

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12 Years a Slave: Man’s (and Woman’s) Inhumanity to Humanity

Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

twelve years a slave

Recently I joined members of my family to view the new movie “Twelve Years a Slave” directed by Steve McQueen and starring Brad Pitt, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Lupita Nyong’o, and an overall stunningly talented cast. Warning: film contains visually graphic images, violence, some nudity. While I actually wasn’t emotionally prepared to see the movie, I am convinced that it should be considered an essential finale to an erstwhile trio of “Lincoln”, “Django” and now “Twelve Years a Slave”.

This could be considered an unlikely combination, these three movies. Yet one could argue that if you see all three of them together, they totally obliterate the cushion of romanticism that movies like “Gone with the Wind” have used to soft sell what is hard core cruelty of one group of human beings towards another. Let us never forget that families are torn apart by racism, reproductive genocide and sexual perversion; together what I term to be the “three headed monster.” All three agents have been at work in America for many years.

To say that the movie “Twelve Years a Slave” is brutally graphic is to minimize the shocking scenes that stun the heart, soul and spirit. In my prolife vocation, showing graphic images of abortion victims are part of what I do. Every time I see a woman on a gurney after a botched abortion, I shudder. Every time I see a picture of an aborted baby, my heart thumps and I feel sick. It was all rather eerie in a way, as I experienced these same sensations as I sat glued to my cushy leather theater chair watching “Twelve Years a Slave.”

I was so relieved to experience the heart of the abolitionists that was there in three of the movies mentioned above. If not for that, I would have left the theaters after viewing each a very angry woman. Yet human compassion arose victorious. We must always pray and give thanks that truth crushed to earth will rise again. God’s truth and grace will always win.

In just a few months, America will observe the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights. The 50th anniversaries of the “I Have a Dream Speech,” “The March on Washington,” and the 150the Anniversary of “The Emancipation Proclamation” are now recent history. And yet the babies are not free. We are still lost in the cloudy veil of deceptive “women’s rights” and “human rights” campaigns while the weakest of all human beings – the little babies in the womb and their vulnerable mothers – are being desecrated on the altars of harmful chemical and surgical “birth control” agents and abortions.

What the whips and nooses did not do to desecrate the sanctity of human life during slavery and segregation the abortion mills are doing quite effectively today. Lynching a person on a tree or in the womb brings about the same results, inhumanity towards our brothers and sisters.

There is a reason that films of this type are being produced, against the odds in some cases. God desires to stir the hearts of men and women. It is time to listen while there is still time.

Watch this video as my mother, Naomi King, recounts a firsthand experience with racism.

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Become An Abolitionist! Help us #AbolishAbortion

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

slavery_abortion_graphic

Another Juneteenth is just around the corner, June 19, 2013, and the babies in the womb are still not free.

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation – which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance.

Not until the Emancipation Proclamation were slaves considered persons for the purposes of rights. Yet, still today, 50 years after the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation and 48 years since Juneteenth, there are people that our country still considers non-persons.

Many babies in their mothers’ wombs, human babies, human people, have been claimed as property by their mothers when they claim, “It’s my body and I can do whatever I want with it.” These babies have been claimed as property belonging to the mothers and can be disposed of as the mother so wished and our government condones it. No, the government champions that right. Usurping any rights that the babies have to life for the mothers’ choice to kill their babies.

Just as in the 1800s there was a need for some people to fight for the rights of others, so it is today but in a more profound way. Today, the pre-born babies don’t have the opportunity to run away from their ‘masters.’ Today, the pre-born babies can’t ask for their life or rights be given to them. Today, the pre-born babies die in silence. Today, the pre-born die in excruciating pain. Today, the pre-born babies sometimes struggle to be born only to be killed seconds or minutes later or just left to drown in a toilet or die in a garbage can.

In a world where we must save and protect the ladybugs, the harbor seal, sea turtle and their eggs and countless others endangered animals; I would think that on top of that list would be all humans, born and pre-born, young and old, regardless of disabilities.

What does that say about our society? Or our country?

Get involved in the abolition movement of our day! Get involved and help Abolish Abortion!

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A Tale of Two Movements: A Women’s History Month Reflection

Wednesday, March 27th, 2013

SPACER130327 blog image

Oppression of women and children is not new to America. In the midst of the 21st Century battle for the children in the womb and the women and mothers who are harmed by abortion and dangerous contraceptives, it seems fitting to remember the valiant freedom fighters and abolitionists who fought for freedom in the previous centuries.

In the past, two American movements, The Abolishment of Slavery of Black People and The Women’s Suffrage Movement grew along together. Slavery as a legal institution began in the early years of the American Colonial era and was fully established by the time the United States sought independence from Great Britain in 1776. By 1804, the northern states instituted abolition laws. By the 1850s the South was still defending slavery and its expansion into the territories. A growing number of northern abolitionists denounced the sin of slavery and a growing anti-slavery Abolitionist Movement rejected slavery as a deterrent to the rights of free men. These actions led to the American Civil War. In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln freed slaves in the southern states through the Emancipation Proclamation. The Thirteenth Amendment, taking effect in December 1865, permanently abolished slavery throughout the entire United States, including the Border states, such as Kentucky, which still had about 50,000 slaves, and the Indian tribes.

While there were champions for the rights of women from the inception of America, a formal movement was launched around 1848 with the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 which formulated the demand for women’s suffrage. The women’s battle was tempered during the Civil War, and the flames were fanned anew and the battle continued.

In 1869 the proposed Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which gave the vote to black men, split the movement. Campaigners such as Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton refused to endorse the amendment, as it did not give the vote to women. Others, such as Lucy Stone and Julia Ward Howe argued that if black men were enfranchised, it would help women achieve their goal. The conflict caused two organizations to emerge, the National Woman Suffrage Association, which campaigned for women’s suffrage at a federal level as well as for married women to be given property rights, and the American Woman Suffrage Association, which aimed to secure women’s suffrage through state legislation.

The groups merged and after 1900 made a new argument to the effect that women’s alleged superior characteristics, especially purity, immunity from corruption and concern with children and local issues, made their votes essential to promoting the reforms of the Progressive Era. Women’s contributions to American participation in the First World War (1917–18) gave the impetus for final victory.

Today, there is still a division in the ranks of women as to what the definition of women’s rights should be. Some women believe that a woman’s rights include the right to kill a baby in her womb. Other women believe that the baby in the womb is a distinctly separate individual person from the mother, and should therefore have civil rights, including the right to live. And there are also many who believe that slavery, women’s rights and abortion are inextricably connected.

Dr. Karen Stevenson, MD, a pro-life advocate, has written an insightful paper that confirms new views on the connection between racism, slavery, and abortion.

While studying the connection between abortion and slavery, one might wish to consider the research respectfully submitted by those who are determined to get to the bottom of the controversies and shed some light on the issue.

1. Excerpt from Utrum by Dr. Karen Stevenson

“As Kathleen Neal Cleaver states in her review of Dorothy Roberts’ book, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the meaning of Liberty, “Roberts learned the significance of reproductive autonomy not from the contemporary abortion movement but from studying the histories of slave women who fought to gain control over their lives.”[1] Any treatise that discusses black women and their reproductive freedoms must take into account the impact of these freedoms on the black community as a whole. Thus, any issue germane to African-American women is also crucial to the welfare of the African-American family and by extension, the African-American community.

Abortion benefits African-American women because it allows them to exercise control over their reproductive destinies.

Slave women in America did not have the right to self-determination, and they had no autonomy over their bodies in any way. The profit driven slave economy benefitted tremendously from their toil and their procreative abilities. The slave woman’s children were not her own, and by the whim of her master, they could be sold away from her, never to be seen again. In post Civil War America, there was no further need for black women to procreate. In fact, her ability to procreate no longer served the greater good.”

2. Excerpt from 2013 Message by Dr. Alveda King

“One can’t help but consider if disregard for the value of women and children is still at the root of abortion today. Consider this, many if not all of the women abolitionists should have been the forerunners of the Pro-Life Movement. Instead, we have a counterfeit “Women’s Rights Movement” which supports abortion and harmful contraceptive drugs today. Why in the world, how in the world could this be?

Remember, both women and men were allowed to be involved with the Anti-Slavery act. But, women could only go so far because they couldn’t vote, and many could not own property. Non-African Women and all slaves were actually considered to be chattel or property back then. So, it was hard for white and black women to be involved as abolitionists because white women were treated in very similar manner to African Americans, and most Black women were slaves. Unfortunately, the same thing was happening to the Native American Population. They were all considered to be chattels.

So the frustrated slave women often aborted their babies (Pure Breed and Mulatto) voluntarily as an act against sustaining future oppression. The Angry Caucasian Wives often coerced or forced abortion on their husband’s “Black Beauties” as a means of retaliation against their own brand of experienced oppression.

If you think about it, the same issues are at the heart of the Middle East Conflict. Sarah’s and Hagar’s sons are brothers with Abraham’s seed, yet their bitter battle still rages. My, what a bitter root of judgment in all these situations!

While many women who were abolitionists ended up becoming women rights activists, bitterness caused them to adopt a contraceptives agenda and finally an abortion agenda to exercise what they considered to be rights over their wombs. So now we have a war on babies and the wombs often led by women and men controlled by a desire for revenge and avarice.”

Read the full text of 2013 message HERE

3. Excerpt from “Jealousy of the Slave Mistresses”

“It is a fact generally observed in slave societies that the mistress is more cruel in her treatment of slaves than the master. It is a fact confirmed by our chronicles, our folklore, our oral tradition, and travelers. There are on record not two or three, but scores of cases of the cruelty of the senhoras de engenho toward defenseless slaves.”

As a post abortive African American Woman, I can attest that abortion kills babies and harms and even sometimes kills their mothers. I bear the harmful fruit of my own abortions in my own body in the form of phlebitis and other lingering health problems from the abortion surgeries and subsequent abortion drugs called contraceptives also meted out to me by Planned Parenthood during my childbearing years. My complete testimony can be found at www.silentnomoreawareness.org. Read HERE or watch HERE

Planned Parenthood, a leader in the women’s movement that believes that the right to kill a baby in the womb is legitimate, lied to me about abortion. They said abortion is safe. It isn’t. Ask all of the dead women and sick women victims of abortion.

While many good hearted people like Susan B. Anthony were abolitionists and supported life affirming women’s rights; at the same time there were many women who were abolitionists that ended up becoming women rights/abortion rights activists whose bitterness caused them to adopt a deceptive contraceptives and finally an abortion “choice” agenda to exercise what they considered to be rights over their wombs.

So now, though the Civil War is over and the Suffragettes Movement is won, we have a war on babies and the wombs of women often led by women and men controlled by a desire for revenge and avarice.

Abortion kills babies and hurts women which is why I recommend that you read Janet Morana’s book RECALL ABORTION.

Also, I invite you to read our book LIFE AT ALL COSTS to receive further enlightenment on these issues, including how Jesus healed my abortion pain.

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When a Nation Becomes Obsolete

Friday, March 15th, 2013

ga-cotton-field-library-of

A few days ago, a person who is a highly respected professional shared a series of blogs with me. The title of the first article, “With no more cotton to pick, what will America do with 40 million black people?” resonated in my being, again. Mark Crutcher of Life Dynamics asks virtually the same question in his best selling documentary Maafa 21. I found this observation chilling in Maafa 21, and just as disturbing by this new release of information in the blog series.

The article starts out by saying that “America is now getting out of the Black people business.” Well, in the African American community, we have known this little secret piece of news for years. Once slavery was over, our people became a burden rather than the high premium free labor we had been during slavery days.

The African American community is a nation within the nation called America. Often, we are still treated as second class citizens. Of course, in Christ we can ultimately agree that there is one human race, and all human beings, born and unborn are created equal, and endowed by our Creator, God, with certain inalienable rights.

In my own testimony as an African American woman, I experienced racial targeting by the abortion industry. I talk about it in my book, How Can The Dream Survive If We Murder The Children? (Also available from your local book retailer)

While we are waiting for America and indeed the world to get this memo, perhaps you will find some of the information in these pages of interest.

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Racism, Slavery, Sexual Immorality and Abortion

Friday, January 4th, 2013

SPACER
Luke 4:18-19
The Spirit of the Lord is on me,
because he has anointed me
to proclaim good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners
and recovery of sight for the blind,
to set the oppressed free,
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.”

Dr. Karen StevensonOur good friend Dr. Karen Stevenson, MD, a pro-life advocate, has written an insightful paper that confirms new views on the connection between racism, slavery, and abortion.

While studying the connection between abortion and slavery, one might wish to consider the research respectfully submitted by those who are determined to get to the bottom of the controversies and shed some light on the issue.

1. Excerpt from Utrum by Dr. Karen Stevenson

“As Kathleen Neal Cleaver states in her review of Dorothy Roberts’ book, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the meaning of Liberty, “Roberts learned the significance of reproductive autonomy not from the contemporary abortion movement but from studying the histories of slave women who fought to gain control over their lives.”[1] Any treatise that discusses black women and their reproductive freedoms must take into account the impact of these freedoms on the black community as a whole. Thus, any issue germane to African-American women is also crucial to the welfare of the African-American family and by extension, the African-American community.

Abortion benefits African-American women because it allows them to exercise control over their reproductive destinies.

Slave women in America did not have the right to self-determination, and they had no autonomy over their bodies in any way. The profit driven slave economy benefitted tremendously from their toil and their procreative abilities. The slave woman’s children were not her own, and by the whim of her master, they could be sold away from her, never to be seen again. In post Civil War America, there was no further need for black women to procreate. In fact, her ability to procreate no longer served the greater good.”

Read the full text from Dr. Stevenson’s paper HERE

2. Excerpt from 2013 Message by Dr. Alveda King

“One can’t help but consider if disregard for the value of women and children is still at the root of abortion today. Consider this, many if not all of the women abolitionists should have been the forerunners of the Pro-Life Movement. Instead, we have a counterfeit “Women’s Rights Movement” which supports abortion and harmful contraceptive drugs today. Why in the world, how in the world could this be?

Remember, both women and men were allowed to be involved with the Anti-Slavery act. But, women could only go so far because they couldn’t vote, and many could not own property. Non-African Women and all slaves were actually considered to be chattel or property back then. So, it was hard for white and black women to be involved as abolitionists because white women were treated in very similar manner to African Americans, and most Black women were slaves. Unfortunately, the same thing was happening to the Native American Population. They were all considered to be chattels.

So the frustrated slave women often aborted their babies (Pure Breed and Mulatto) voluntarily as an act against sustaining future oppression. The Angry Caucasian Wives often coerced or forced abortion on their husband’s “Black Beauties” as a means of retaliation against their own brand of experienced oppression.

If you think about it, the same issues are at the heart of the Middle East Conflict. Sarah’s and Hagar’s sons are brothers with Abraham’s seed, yet their bitter battle still rages. My, what a bitter root of judgment in all these situations!

While many women who were abolitionists ended up becoming women rights activists, bitterness caused them to adopt a contraceptives agenda and finally an abortion agenda to exercise what they considered to be rights over their wombs. So now we have a war on babies and the wombs often led by women and men controlled by a desire for revenge and avarice.”

Read the full text of 2013 message HERE

3. Excerpt from Slavery _____ Jealousy of the Slave Mistresses

“It is a fact generally observed in slave societies that the mistress is more cruel in her treatment of slaves than the master. It is a fact confirmed by our chronicles, our folklore, our oral tradition, and travelers. There are on record not two or three, but scores of cases of the cruelty of the senhoras de engenho toward defenseless slaves.”

Reference: “Sex and Race, Volume III, by J.A.
Rogers, pp. 295-296. 1944 & 1972.

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the article above.

RUNAWAY SLAVE: A Must See Movie

Monday, July 16th, 2012

My good friend C. L. Bryant’s new movie, RUNAWAY SLAVE, is finally being released on July 27, 2012 in selected theatres.

Here is what they say on their website about the movie:

As Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in the summer of 1963, he delivered one of the most powerful speeches in our nation’s history. Known for its famous line, “I have a dream,” Dr. King concluded his speech with these words:

“And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, ‘Free at last, free at last! Thank God Almighty, we’re free at last!’”

Now, nearly a half-century later, has his dream become reality? Have we allowed freedom to truly ring? Or has that longed-for freedom somehow become even more elusive?

In RUNAWAY SLAVE, an intriguing new documentary that opens in theaters this summer, Rev. C.L. Bryant journeys across America to find answers. A one-time NAACP local chapter president, Rev. Bryant discovers that by buying into the entitlement mindset of “progressives,” the black community has traded one form of tyranny for another.

Using leading black conservatives as “conductors,” Rev. Bryant believes it is time for a new Underground Railroad to help liberate all Americans from the Government plantation that has left the black community dealing with a new form of slavery: entitlements.

“Why are we still thinking we are not free at last? What ideas are keeping us down?” Rev. Bryant asks. “For too long, we have been depending on other people for our success. We have to pursue our happiness; our happiness is not provided to us. If we are relying on someone else for our wellbeing, that in itself is a form of slavery.”

From our nation’s capital and freedom’s birthplace, to the dens of slavery and Jim Crow, to wherever a light for liberty is shining, this runaway slave looks to bring hope to the oppressed. Among the leaders he talks with along the way are Dr. King’s niece, Dr. Alveda King; former presidential candidate Herman Cain; Congressman Allen West; economist and author Dr. Thomas Sowell; talk-show host and author Glenn Beck; the late Andrew Breitbart. We also meet a new generation of young freedom fighters who are on the front lines of change!

Rev. Bryant’s conclusion? It’s time to run. “Run away from economic slavery. Run toward the blessings of liberty. Let us remain strong in this fight. Run away from socialism; run away from progressivism. And if you get tired, America … run harder!”

This summer, celebrate your freedom by running as fast and as hard as you can to see RUNAWAY SLAVE in theaters.

Here is a wonderful intervew of C. L. Bryant. Enjoy!

For more information on the movie please visit www.runawayslavemovie.com.

Meanwhile, watch the trailer here:

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Lift Every Voice and Sing

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

As we come to the end of “Black History Month,” it seems fitting to share the lyrics to the “Negro National Anthem” written by James Weldon Johnson as a poem to honor Booker T. Washington. Later, James’ brother John set the poetry to music. When I was a little girl in the 20th century, we sang the song at school, church and other public events, and sometimes at home. The song isn’t just poetic, it is prophetic, in that it is timeless, and while written out of the pain of the “Negro” experience, it is also relevant today and is meaningful for the babies in the womb today – all babies – not just African American babies. The stony road being trod, and the bitter chastening rod refer to human slavery and the oppression of Blacks, but the babies are suffering oppression today. I pray that you will enjoy the song, and maybe listen to it on youtube. Let us all march on till victory is won for all, born and unborn!

LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING

Lift every voice and sing, till earth and heaven ring,
Ring with the harmonies of liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise, high as the list’ning skies,
Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
Sing a song full of the faith
that the dark past has taught us,
Sing a song full of the hope
that the present has brought us;
Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
Let us march on till victory is won.

Stony the road we trod, bitter the chast’ning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat, have not our weary feet,
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way
that with tears has been watered.
We have come, treading our path
thro’ the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from a gloomy past, till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam
of our bright star is cast.

God of our weary years, God of our silent tears,
Thou Who has brought us thus far on the way;
Thou Who hast by Thy might, led us into the light,
Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
Lest our feet stray from the places
Our God where we met Thee,
Lest our hearts drunk with the wine of the world
we forget Thee;
Shadowed beneath Thy hand
May we forever stand,
True to our God,
True to our native land.

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