Archive for the ‘Zimmerman’ Category

Martin/Zimmerman Dilemma: Would MLK Boycott?

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

130730 blog image

In light of all of the discussions occurring now about boycotting the state of Florida because of the unrest over the Martin/Zimmerman verdict, I believe that certainly it is appropriate to express, in a peaceful and non-violent manner, the concerns that are being raised.

In regards to the 1960s, people are asking me would this Florida boycott have been an appropriate target back then? Certainly in the 20th Century, boycotts were the order of that day, so possibly yes, that could have happened back then. Of course cannot say whether Martin Luther King, Jr. would have led such a march since he’s not here, but according to his own words, we can believe that he would have opposed stereotyping and profiling. Yet we can also believe he would be calling for peaceful nonviolent resolution as well as reconciliation of the one human race.

We who engage in nonviolent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive.
– “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” April 16, 1963

I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word in reality. This is why right temporarily defeated is stronger than evil triumphant.
– Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech,

Along these lines there is a movement that is occurring at the same time as the Florida boycott and that is the reconciliation rallies led by people of good will of every ethnic group rising up in Florida at this time.

Charisma Magazine’s Steve Strang one of the organizers of the Restoration Meetings had this to say in a recent column:

“The George Zimmerman acquittal a week ago has brought to the surface racial divides in our country, and it’s time for believers in Jesus to get involved because the best answers are spiritual, available to us through fervent prayer. There must be forgiveness, and mercy always triumphs over justice.”

The organizers are planning on taking those reconciliation rallies across the country saying, pretty much, that mercy overrides human judgment.

We know that the judgment that acquitted George Zimmerman was man’s judgment based on man’s law, the stand your ground law. Admittedly, there are some problems with that law. However, God’s justice does contain mercy. We are required to do justice, love mercy, and to walk upright and humbly before God.

So I’m asking that there be a reconciliation message for Florida and for the country that we must reconcile as one blood, one human race. Truly we are one human race, and indeed we can be brothers and sisters and not combat and fight each other and kill each other.

We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.
– MLK Speech in St. Louis, Missouri, March 22, 1964

This nation needs healing. It needs a message of reconciliation. As a minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, I am appealing to all concerned to please consider reconciliation as a major part of the message that must be delivered.

Now, does there need to be justice for Trayvon? I happen to believe there should be. What form will that justice take? The answer has yet to be revealed.

I was truly saddened to hear that some have besmirched the memory of Trayvon by relegating him to the category of being labeled a thug with the implication that he deserved to be dead. Our children have a right to be born, to dream and to see their dreams come true. When they get off track, they should be firmly yet lovingly corrected. If we teach them and love them, they can live and not die!

This is a very tragic situation. Trayvon’s dreams went to his grave with him. I’m praying that God will have the final word on all of this.

I’m praying for the Martins. I’m praying for the Zimmermans. I’m praying for all concerned.

Reconciliation is in order!

Many celebrity protestors are quietly pro-life. It would be good if they would speak to sanctity of life from conception till natural death in their efforts. Finally, in every conflict let us strongly urge repentance, forgiveness and Reconciliation over Boycotts.

Just in case you haven’t heard any celebrity prolife messages, check out Nick Cannon, Fred Hammond and Flipsyde.

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Looking for Justice for America

Friday, July 19th, 2013

Acts 17:26 “And He has made from one blood, every nation of men . . .”

“We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Speech in St. Louis, Missouri, March 22, 1964

It’s been quite a busy week.

It’s bigger than Trayvon and George.

We MUST have the race discussion.

Here are a few examples of interviews I did.

HLN RAISING AMERICA.

To go to HLN click HERE.

MIKE HUCKABEE

Watch the interview HERE

THE MANNING REPORT

To go to The Manning Report click HERE.

Upcoming Interview:

Saturday, July 20 at 6:40 pm ET – CNN Newsroom with Don Lemon

Saturday, July 20 at 10:00 pm ET – Fox News’ Geraldo at Large

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Dr. Alveda C. King: Judge by Content of Character, not Skin Color or Hoodies

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

MLK in Hoodie

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 17, 2013

Contact: Leslie Palma
Leslie@priestsforlife.org
(347) 286-7277

While I salute the passion and creativity of artist Nikkolas Smith in reference to the image of MLK wearing a hoodie, I feel compelled to cry “foul, shame on you” to the media moguls and civil rights legends who want to stir up a controversy where there is none. I am not angered by the artistic expression. I am just plain hurt and saddened to see the message of my uncle Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. reduced to a debate over an article of clothing. I would love to talk with artist Nikkolas about my uncle.

“Shallow understanding from people of good will is more frustrating than absolute misunderstanding from people of ill will.”
– Martin Luther King, Jr. “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” April 16, 1963

My grandfather was always a meticulously dressed and well groomed man. He encouraged and actually insisted that his family follow his lead, because he was grooming us all to represent Jesus, our family and our community. Uncle M. L. and Daddy grew up to become leaders and did their best to honor and respect their father’s teachings. Like all humans, they sometimes fell short, but not for lack of trying.

I am no way suggesting that hoodies are a bad thing. The young folks in my family wear them. They are actually handy o\in the rain. Yet there are other ways to remember Dr. King. Perhaps most importantly that way would be found in his sermons and letters.

“We must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.”
– Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Speech in St. Louis, Missouri, March 22, 1964

As to the controversy, George Zimmerman seemingly never explored the content of Trayvon Martin’s character. Rather he identified and profiled Travon Martin according to Trayvon’s choice of attire which was a hoodie. We as African-Americans should never be racially profiled. We must advocate as Martin Luther King, Jr. advocated; for defining ourselves by the content of our character rather than according to the color of our skin or choice of attire. This should be the standard for every ethnic group, every family and every individual.

Unfortunately, the trial was about finding reasonable doubt in a murder case; as to what happened the night Zimmerman shot Trayvon. Reasonable doubt was established, and thus human justice was served in a human court of law. Yet, was everyone so concerned about serving man’s legal system that we forgot to serve God?

Sadly, the legal aspects of the trial were not about whether or not George Zimmerman racially profiled Trayvon Martin. That issue now becomes a matter of civil rather than criminal law. The criminal legal process was not about hoodies and candy. It wasn’t even about smoking marijuana. By the way, two United States Presidents admit to having smoked marijuana as young men, one says he inhaled and one says he didn’t.

This leads me to wonder what kind of man Trayvon Martin would have become if he had been allowed to live.

By observing his parents during the time of his tragic and fatal shooting and this trial, I am sure that Trayvon would have turned out just fine. His parents have called for justice and peace during their suffering and loss throughout this entire ordeal. My prayers continue to go out to them.

In the final analysis, Trayvon Martin represented humanity, life and purpose as ordained by God for all persons, in and out of the womb; and he deserved not to be profiled; but rather regarded as a precious soul.

Trayvon wore a hoodie not because he was black, but because it was his choice of style for teens in this time in our society. His clothing should never have been a factor in defining him.

As Martin Luther King, Jr. was called to greatness, you, I and yes Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman were called to greatness, purpose and the right to live in America. The difference is that MLK lived long enough to answer his call.

Trayvon was killed before he could live out his call and dream, which is buried with him. George Zimmerman made a decision that has changed his life as well.

Every human being is part of the one single human race. We are one blood; One race. We are Created with a dream inside, and when we are allowed to be born and to live out our God ordained lives, we have a chance to be great.

Would Martin Luther King, Jr. as a teenager wear a hoodie in the 21st Century? I may not think so, but who knows. Would Martin Luther King, Jr. weep at the tragic loss of the life and dream of Trayvon Martin, and the now deferred dream of George Zimmerman? Most likely.

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Give God His Due In Trayvon/Zimmerman Saga

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

Trayvon_Zimmerman

Listen on audio HERE.

Hello, I’m Dr. Alveda King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life and Founder of Alveda King Ministries.

This is 2013, summer, we’re about to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington and the famous “I Have a Dream” speech by my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

My father, Rev. A.D. King and my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., whom I call Uncle ML, worked together in the Civil Rights Movement.

Today, in the 21st Century, during this long, hot summer, we’ve had a verdict for George Zimmerman in the killing of Trayvon Martin. We grieve the passing of young Mr. Trayvon Martin. His dreams have been deferred and buried with him. He no longer has a dream here on this earth. However, America again is in turmoil as we look at that verdict. I’d like to put it this way. We have given justice its due, now let’s give God His due.

We should join together in prayer during this tumultuous season and bring America together so that historically we can remember when a young man was slain in America, Trayvon Martin, America was saddened and grieved and came together and prayed.

Politically, I have been called and termed a Conservative. My cousin, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s daughter, Dr. Bernice King, can be called a Moderate. And our cousin, Dr. Angela Farris Watkins, the daughter of Dr. King’s sister, can also perhaps been termed a Liberal.

However, we may have differing political viewpoints but one thing is not debatable: violence will never be the answer in solving the problems of a society. We must now turn to our knees, fall on our knees, and ask God to bring us together as one human race. No longer will we accept the lie that we are separate races. Acts 17:26 says, “Of one blood we were all created together. “

As brothers and sisters, let us move forward together ,racially, reconciling to the fact that we are one human race, not divided but together, in need of help, in need of guidance, in need of love.

God bless you all,
Dr. Alveda King

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Dr. Alveda King: “Grieved Over Strife Surrounding Zimmerman Verdict”

Monday, July 15th, 2013

Trayvon_Zimmerman

For Immediate Release
July 15, 2013

Contact: Leslie Palma
Leslie@priestsforlife.org
(347) 286-7277

“I believe that the verdict in the Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin Case further exposes a grievous and deep vein of disharmony and racial tension in our nation that can only be healed when people realize that every human being should be treated with dignity and respect,” says Dr. Alveda King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life.

“A trial like this causes public debate, and people have forgotten what is right anymore. Now Trayvon’s tragic death is obscured and Mr. Zimmerman is a public spectacle. The lines of what is right and what is legal/lawful have also been blurred and this trial exposes that.

“We saw the same scenarios in the O. J. trial and the Casey Anthony case. There was reasonable doubt, no matter how minute the reasonable doubt proves to be. Even more recently, abortionists are butchering women in so called legal yet under-regulated facilities where in many cases no arrests are being made; with Kermit Gosnell’s case being a recent exception.

“In Chicago, where random killings are at an all time high, a Black Woman, Tonya Reaves, was recently slaughtered and bled to death for five hours in a Planned Parenthood abortion mill and no arrests have been made.

“Now in the wake of Trayvon’s senseless death and Mr. Zimmerman’s acquittal many people are angry at the tragic loss of life and what some perceive to be a shun on the Black race. For the record, Acts 17:26 teaches that there is one blood and one human race, not multiple races, so racism is based on a lie!

“Others seem to feel a victory because certain constitutional rights were favorably argued and the question of reasonable doubt prevailed in this case. Yet it is important to also note that Zimmerman’s life is ruined too, and that the court of public opinion is not completely on his side.

“So in a way the blind scales of justice seem to have favored Mr. Zimmerman while Trayvon’s voice is silenced and his dream died with him.

“The Bible says mercy triumphs over justice:

“For judgment is without mercy to the one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment.” (James 2:13 NKJV)

“And Micah 6:8 says that we should add love and humility to justice.

“Micah 6:8 (NIV)
8 He has shown you, O mortal, what is good.
And what does the Lord require of you?
To act justly and to love mercy
and to walk humbly[a] with your God.

“Love and humility are missing on both sides of this struggle!

“My uncle Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said that we must all learn to live together as brothers (and sisters) or perish as fools. Too many people are dying today for too many reasons, and the race baiting and strife add fuel to the fire which grieves my soul.

“Again a young American man has perished, another is a public spectacle. Who wins?

“We must now use this controversy as an opportunity to help educate our future generations as to how to act and how to react in similar situations; then maybe young Trayvon’s death will not be in vain.

“A profound injustice has occurred in glossing over the death of this young man and the suffering of his family. The not guilty verdict violates the tender nuances of human suffering and the integrity of the criminal justice system in his community.

“It remains critically-important, however, that all protests against the verdict demonstrate an irrevocable commitment to nonviolence, to honor the dignity of Trayvon Martin’s precious life and not add further tragedy to what his family and the people of Sanford have already experienced.

“Let’s face it. If both people in this tragedy were of common ethnicity, there would be no media feeding frenzy. The gun control debate is a smokescreen in that people do use guns to kill other people as Zimmerman did in this case. But guns don’t kill people. People kill people. Yes, sometimes they use guns, but they sometimes use bombs or knives too. We definitely need love control and heart control and nonviolence control.

“There are murders going on every day that the media overlooks. Remember Tonya Reaves. Millions of Black babies and many of their mothers are being slaughtered in abortion mills. Where is the justice for that?

“Obviously strife and struggle and conflict were at the base of this case. Two men alone on the street in the dark. A punch is thrown. A gun escalates the trauma and drama. We need a Beloved Community. We need nonviolence conflict resolution.

“Let us please give a nonviolent response to Trayvon’s family, to Mr. Zimmerman and to America to help to promote healing and to lay the foundation needed to repeal faulty laws that fail to protect our youth, and to further enact other reforms to prevent such tragedies in the future.”

Click HERE for another perspective.

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