Archive for December, 2010

An Opportunity to Reflect on the Gift of Time

Friday, December 31st, 2010

The conclusion of another year should help us reflect upon what we have done and what we have failed to do. Tonight, an exchange is completed — God gives us the gift of time and we use it in loving service to others.

What have we done this year for the defense of life? Whatever we did, we can be sure that God multiplies the effect of our efforts. We can also be sure that the New Year will offer us the chance to do even more. Let us resolve tonight that we will increase the amount of time and energy we devote to what the Pope and bishops have called the number one moral issue: restoring the right to life!

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Post-Abortive Women React to MTV’s “No Easy Decision”

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

Staten Island, NY – Women from the Silent No More Awareness Campaign (SNMAC) reacted with sorrow and disappointment today at MTV’s “No Easy Decision” program depicting a young mother with an infant child who goes through an abortion.

“My heart broke for Markai, not just for her difficult situation, but for the lack of counseling she received,” said Georgette Forney, a co-founder of SNMAC. “This abortion decision was driven by economics, but no one told Markai about the help available to her from pregnancy resource centers. No one told her that this didn’t have to be ‘Sophie’s Choice,’ having one child die so the other could live.”

“The abortion clinic told this young woman to think of her unborn baby ‘as a little ball of cells,’” added Janet Morana, another co-founder of SNMAC. “It was yet another example of so called abortion counselors acting as unethical salesmen, telling women anything to influence them toward abortion.”

Dr. Alveda King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life and a SNMAC spokeswoman, said she identified with the young woman in the program. “I ached for Markai,” stated Dr. King. “Before one of my abortions, Planned Parenthood told me that my baby was ‘just a clump of cells.’ Decades later, this beautiful young mother was told the same lie. I pray that Markai and all women like her will seek true healing and restoration from a caring post-abortion program like Rachel’s Vineyard.”

Since the launching of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign in 2003, 3,877 women and men have shared their testimonies publicly at over 572 gatherings in 48 states and ten countries where more than 110,830 attendees have heard the truth about abortion’s negative aftereffects. More than 9,027 people are registered to be Silent No More. Raising awareness about the hurtful aftermath of abortion and the help that is available to cope with the pain are two of the Campaign’s goals.

The Silent No More Awareness Campaign is a joint project of Anglicans for Life and Priests for Life. For more information, please visit our website: www.SilentNoMoreAwareness.org

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A Consistent Ethic of Life

Thursday, December 30th, 2010

The service that the Church carries out to humanity embraces life at every stage and in every circumstance. Our “ethic of life” is indeed consistent, because love is indivisible. To fail to respect a human life at any stage of its development is to break the principle that holds it sacred at every stage of its development.

That is why one may never use our duty to life at one stage as a justification for destroying it at another. Some have tried to do this in the health care debate, by their willingness to expand child killing in the process of helping adults get medical treatment. This approach is self-defeating, because as soon as we tolerate the killing of children, we undercut every rationale to provide health care to both children and adults.

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God Rescues His People from Oppression

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

“I have heard the cry of my people who are being oppressed…Therefore I have come down to rescue them.” So God speaks to Moses when he calls him to lead God’s people to freedom. The Exodus from Egypt, as well as the Paschal Mystery – that is, the central events of the Old and New Testaments — are both about God rescuing His people who are being oppressed. Our forefathers were oppressed as slaves in Egypt and rescued through the waters of the Red Sea. We are oppressed by sin and death, and are rescued through the waters of baptism. Yet the rescued must also rescue. The saved must also save. We cannot turn to God for mercy and be deaf to the cries of others for mercy. That’s why we save the unborn from abortion.

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Feast of the Holy Innocents

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

This Feast of the Holy Innocents leads Christians to reflect on the tragedy of abortion, and today leads many to pray in front of abortion facilities, where innocent blood is shed. Just as Christmas should be celebrated every day in our hearts, so the Feast of the Holy Innocents should be celebrated every day. Our hearts should be broken as the bodies of these babies are broken, and the souls of those who kill them are weighed down with the burden of guilt and despair. Yet we are the people of Life, and we bring into this world the hope that comes from the birth of Christ and from the birth of every baby. We bring the hope of forgiveness and the determination to work daily for an end to the modern-day slaughter of the innocents.

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Humility is Key

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

If we read the letters of St. Paul in the order in which they were written, we see that Paul displays an increasing awareness of his sinfulness as life goes on. “Paul, apostle of Christ Jesus,” he begins. Later he says, “Apostle and servant.” Yet later he declares himself “not worthy to be called an apostle”, and finally, he calls himself “the chief of sinners.” Contrary to what some of our critics say, we in the Church and in the pro-life movement are not self-righteous people who think we are better than everyone else and want to tell others how to live. Rather, we begin with repentance, realizing that we recognize the sins in the world only after we’ve recognized our own. That is the spirit in which we build a culture of life.

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The Obligations of Christian Faith

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010

“Behold, I proclaim to you good news of great joy that will be for all the people…A Savior has been born for you” (Luke 1:10-11).

The good news of Christmas is for everyone, including the unborn.

In fact, we can say it is addressed especially to them, because they are the most helpless.

The good news of Christ’s birth was announced first precisely to the lowly, not to the great and powerful. The ministry of the One who was born for us continued to follow that pattern: He consistently sought out those who were on the outskirts of society.

We are called to do the same. To welcome the Savior means to welcome the obligations that His mission places on us. This Christmas, let us resolve to intervene for the unborn child.

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No Room at the Inn

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

“She laid Him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.” The fact that there was no room for Jesus, Mary, and Joseph in the inn at Bethlehem on the first Christmas should make us wonder. The birth of Christ was planned by God from all eternity, and the details of His birth and life were announced by the prophets. How could God forget to make room for His only Son, the Child who owns the world, and every inch of room in the whole universe?

Obviously, God did this on purpose. There was no room in the inn because God wanted to show that His Son comes as a Savior, to reconcile a world that is at enmity with God. Today, He does not seek an inn; He seeks room in our own hearts and lives.

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The Dignity of Humanity Derives from the Incarnation

Monday, December 20th, 2010

At Midnight Mass of Christmas, we hear the glorious announcement that a Savior has been born for us. From the beginning of time, prophets announced that the Messiah of the Lord would come. “Messiah,” or “Christ” means “Anointed One.” God anointed many people to carry out special missions for Him.

On Christmas, this prophecy was fulfilled in a surprising way, because the angels did not simply announce that Jesus was the Messiah of the Lord. They said the newborn child was Messiah AND Lord. God did not just send a Messiah. He came Himself. This Child is the God who made us all. And by coming in this way, He joined every human life, born and unborn, to Himself. Christmas is, indeed, the feast of the dignity of every human life.

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The Incarnation Gives Us a New Perspective

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Christmas, for which we are now preparing, is not simply the feast of the birth of Christ; it is the feast of His becoming human, the reality called the Incarnation. Christ took flesh within the body of the Virgin Mary when she said “Yes” to His coming, nine months before His birth. Christmas, in its full meaning, is the feast that celebrates that moment, along with His birth, as one wonderful reality of God becoming one of us.

Jesus was an embryo, a fetus, an unborn child. Life in the womb, which was already sacred because it comes from God, is now made even more holy, and worthy of our every sacrifice.

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