Archive for the ‘Charity’ Category

Fr. Pavone Salutes Kalitta MedFlight, “Heroes” in the Flight of Baby Joseph to St. Louis

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011





Staten Island, NY – Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, today praised Kalitta MedFlight of Ypsilanti, Michigan, for its key role in flying Baby Joseph Maraachli from a Toronto hospital to Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center in St. Louis.

“The flight of Baby Joseph to St. Louis for medical treatment was carried out by Kalitta MedFlight,” said Fr. Pavone. “Kalitta MedFlight came to us when they heard about Baby Joseph, and offered to help. We worked with them on the details, and were ready to pay for all the expenses. Then, on top of their courteous and professional service, they also told us that they would not charge for their services, which included not only a fully equipped Learjet, but also a Critical Care Pediatric Transport Team to ensure Baby Joseph’s safe transfer.”

Doug Kalitta, owner and operator of Kalitta MedFlight, generously donated a Learjet fully equipped with a Critical Care Pediatric Transport Team to help facilitate the safe transport of Baby Joseph to St. Louis, MO. Kalitta MedFlight is based at Willow Run Airport in Ypsilanti, MI.

“There are many people to thank in this collaborative effort, but Kalitta MedFlight stepped up early on with its generous offer of highest quality transport care,” added Fr. Pavone. “The people at Kalitta MedFlight are heroes in this story.”

Baby Joseph Maraachli is the now-famous one-year-old who was refused a tracheotomy by a hospital near his Canadian home. He was flown in a specially equipped plane Sunday night to St. Louis where doctors will assess and treat him.

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Forgive Us Our Sins

Thursday, February 10th, 2011





In the Lord’s prayer, we ask that we may be forgiven our sins “as we forgive those who sin against us.” We are asking the Lord to use us as an example of how readily and generously He should forgive our sins.

He is more eager to forgive our sins than we are. This should not only give us confidence, but should help us inspire confidence in those who despair. One of the hardest sins to confess is abortion. And even there, the Lord is ready to pour out His mercy on those who repent.

Nothing can minimize the horror of abortion, and nothing can justify it. Yet countless people come each day to the cross where they find that even this sin is washed away in the Blood of Christ.

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Convergence

Monday, January 3rd, 2011





Each January, three observances converge that reinforce each other and summon the Christian world to work together against injustice. January 15 is the birthday of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and on or around that day we observe a national holiday in his honor. A week later, on January 22, we recall the tragic decision made that day in 1973 by the Supreme Court in Roe vs. Wade, unleashing a policy of abortion on demand. On or around January 22, large rallies and marches for life are held from coast to coast. And from January 18 to 15th each year, the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity is observed.

These three great movements are deeply intertwined.

Jesus Christ prayed that His followers would be one, as He and the Father are one. Authentic Christian unity does not mean pretending there are no serious doctrinal disagreements between denominations. It does mean working to come to a deeper understanding of what those differences are and are not, as well as recognizing and building on the real unity that does exist in our common affirmation of Christ and His Lordship in our lives and in the world.

That affirmation of Christ requires that we work to fight injustice. In His encyclical letter on Christian Unity, issued in 1995, Pope John Paul II wrote, “Many Christians from all Communities, by reason of their faith, are jointly involved in bold projects aimed at changing the world by inculcating respect for the rights and needs of everyone, especially the poor, the lowly, and the defenseless…Christians who once acted independently are now engaged together in the service of this cause, so that God’s mercy may triumph” (n. 43).

Both the civil rights movement and the pro-life movement are evidence of this common engagement. Both movements seek to secure equal rights for marginalized human beings, despite their appearances, and to apply to law and culture the promises of the Gospel. Both movements have found their “meeting place” and their “launching pad” in the Churches, manifesting this declaration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.:

“I’m always happy to see a relevant ministry. It’s alright to talk about ‘long white robes over yonder,’ in all of its symbolism. But ultimately people want some suits and dresses and shoes to wear down here. It’s alright to talk about ‘streets flowing with milk and honey,’ but God has commanded us to be concerned about the slums down here, and His children who can’t eat three square meals a day. It’s alright to talk about the new Jerusalem, but one day, God’s preacher must talk about the new New York, the new Atlanta, the new Philadelphia, the new Los Angeles, the new Memphis, Tennessee. This is what we have to do.”

Defending the equal dignity of every human being after birth strengthens our witness to the rights of those in danger before birth, and vice-versa. The witness, in fact, is ultimately one: the witness to the one Christ, who restores dignity to every human life.

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Humility is Key

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010





If we read the letters of St. Paul in the order in which they were written, we see that Paul displays an increasing awareness of his sinfulness as life goes on. “Paul, apostle of Christ Jesus,” he begins. Later he says, “Apostle and servant.” Yet later he declares himself “not worthy to be called an apostle”, and finally, he calls himself “the chief of sinners.” Contrary to what some of our critics say, we in the Church and in the pro-life movement are not self-righteous people who think we are better than everyone else and want to tell others how to live. Rather, we begin with repentance, realizing that we recognize the sins in the world only after we’ve recognized our own. That is the spirit in which we build a culture of life.

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