The Parasitical Relationship of Abortion Centers with Poor Minority Communities

Planned Parenthood Minority

by Kevin Burke, LSW

Par·a·site:  An organism that lives in or on another organism (its host) and benefits by deriving nutrients at the host’s expense.

Abortion rights propaganda has influenced many of our nation’s citizens, and tragically many Christians, to see abortion as a woman’s private and personal health care decision.

Abortion may be considered private in that it is often a closely guarded secret. But the emotional and spiritual shockwaves after the procedure make it very much a family and community mental health concern.

In 2014 Pope Francis shared:

“How many hurt families, how many broken marriages…there is a crisis in the family.”

In the month of September, the Shockwaves Initiative shines a bright light on Abortion and the Family.

Tragically it is the poorest minority communities that are targeted by the abortion industry. They suffer higher rates of abortion and are especially vulnerable to strong post abortion reactions.

Abortion facilities have a parasitical relationship with their host minority communities.

When poor women and men participate in the death of their unborn children, it connects in a powerful way with any previous emotional trauma.

The abortion event can serve as the spark that ignites the anger and pain from previous abuse and neglect into the flames of raging addiction, relationship dysfunction, and abuse and neglect of living children.

We see these dynamics active in the high abortion rate among the male prison population, and the relationship between absent and abusive fathers, an involvement in abortion, and severe post abortion symptoms such as violence and high risk behaviors.

It’s a vicious cycle in poor minority communities that creates more customers for Planned Parenthood, more dead unborn babies, more wounded women and men, and more broken relationships and families.

Hope in the Darkness

Awareness and healing are already beginning to break the power of the culture of death. You can read here on our Shockwaves site of the experience of an African American woman, Onawu Pickett who suffered rape and abuse, and later abortion loss.   Her participation in a Rachel’s Vineyard weekend opened the door to her reconciliation and restoration in Christ, and a calling to reach out to others African American women and men wounded by abortion.

A Rachel’s Vineyard program in two maximum security prisons in Florida is helping men repent of their role in the death of their unborn children, and in that recovery process to grieve and heal of their childhood wounds with their fathers.   Immersed in God’s mercy and grace these men reclaim the fatherhood of their unborn children and reach out with the love of Christ to their fellow inmates.

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