Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s niece speaks about injustice of abortions at Ave Maria

 

Sarah Donovan

  Naples Daily News -- Naples. FL
  6/8/2010
 

See pictures from this event

AVE MARIA — The late civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s niece is “silent no more.” Dr. Alveda King had two abortions as a young woman and openly regrets them.

“I had two abortions and a miscarriage related to damage from those abortions,” King said on Tuesday night before she spoke to local anti-abortion activists of all ages on Tuesday night at the Ave Maria School of Law in Naples.

Now King is a leading anti-abortion activist and acts as a voice for the Silent No More Awareness Campaign — A project of Priests for Life and Anglicans for Life, that mobilizes men and women who have lost a child to abortion, have experienced healing and want to share their testimony. The campaign promotes healing and a greater awareness of the wounds abortion causes.

As a proud mother of six and grandmother of six, King now travels around the U.S. motivating, educating and inspiring others to join her in the fight against abortion.

“I realized that I was violating the civil rights of a person,” King said. “When I had my abortions, we were told that it was a blob of tissue and not a person.”

In addition, King is a pastoral associate and director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life — an organization that tries to galvanize the clergy to preach, teach, and mobilize their people more effectively in the effort to end abortion and euthanasia.

During her speech — which was organized by Lucia Barone, a chairman of the board for the Collier Pregnancy Centers Inc. — King offered information and facts about abortion, Planned Parenthood and her late uncle’s true opinion about abortion. King asserted that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was against abortion, however, his wife, Coretta Scott King, was an abortion rights activist.

“I think what she shared about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s pro-life legacy was impactful,” said Josh Craddock, an 18-year-old youth action team manager for Personhood USA — an organization that tries to initiate efforts to establish legal personhood for unborn children through peaceful activism, legislative efforts and ballot-access petition initiatives.

“She pointed out that her uncle said wait means never with the Civil Rights movement,” Craddock said. “I think that the same thing is true for the pro-life movement, so we need to push for recognition of personhood for the unborn now.”

As the daughter of Rev. A. D. King, a leader in the Civil Right’s movement, King sees the anti-abortion movement as a continuation of the Civil Rights movement.

“Abortion is genocide,” King said. “It’s killing populations. It’s killing generations and certainly the population that is most impacted by abortion in America is the black community. So I feel that as a civil rights leader I have responsibility to proclaim that black Americans are being exterminated by the genocidal acts of abortion.”

Ed Melone said he came to listen to King speak because his passion is anti-abortion activism.

He said he was troubled by the fact that even though African Americans make up about one eighth of the population, they have more than one-third of America’s 1.2 million annual abortions.

“In the previous centuries, we fought over the identity of a person based upon his or her skin color,” King said. “With the passage of Roe v. Wade in 1973, the identity of a person became linked as well to gestational size. So to call a person not a person because of his or her skin color or because of his or her age is a civil injustice, and my uncle said a threat to justice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

E-mail Sarah Donovan at sdonovan2@gmail.com.