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Twenty-Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

En español

General Intercessions: [English PDF]
 

Celebrant: Moses kept his hands raised in prayer for all God's people. We also bring the needs of our brothers and sisters before God's throne today.

Deacon/Lector:

That believers in all parts of the world may always enjoy the freedom to pray in public and to worship God according to His command, we pray to the Lord...

That government leaders and candidates for public office may always acknowledge that the source of all law and authority is in God alone, we pray to the Lord...

That God's people may persevere in their prayers and works to eliminate abortion, infanticide, euthanasia, and every form of injustice against human life, we pray to the Lord... 

For deeper unity, understanding, and practical cooperation between the different Christian denominations, we pray to the Lord...

That all in need of our prayers, especially the sick and dying, may be surrounded by God's grace and healing love, we pray to the Lord...

For our departed loved ones, that the angels may receive them into Paradise, we pray to the Lord...

Celebrant:

Father, 
We thank you for the power of prayer,
Which is simply the power of your love.
Give us the joy of knowing that love
All the days of our lives.
We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Bulletin Insert:
 

I Had Four Abortions

I had 4 abortions. The first when I was 18 after the first time I had sex. My parents didn’t know. The boy offered to pay for the abortion. Basically, my friend took me by the hand and led me to the clinic where there was no discussion about alternatives, just an appointment made. The second one, I took myself. The third one – my same boyfriend was involved. The fourth one I did alone. When I gave birth to my first baby, the reality of what I had done hit me like a ton of bricks. My husband and I have been profoundly affected. Our sex life is nil – we have unresolved guilt and anger. There’s no telling what the impact has been on me, I am just opening the door to it all. But I know one thing – if it hadn’t been legal, I would not have been so promiscuous. No way! –Mary, CA

Homily Suggestions:
 

Ex 17:8-13
2 Tm 3:14 - 4:2
Lk 18:1-8

Watch a video with homily hints

Today’s readings are not only focused on the efficacy of prayer, but more specifically on the efficacy of prayer amidst battle and conflict. In the first reading, it is a battle for the very survival of God’s people against fierce enemies; in the Gospel, it is a legal battle for justice. 

The connection with the pro-life movement is clear on both the theme of prayer and conflict. In “The Gospel of Life,” John Paul II wrote, “It is possible to speak in a certain sense of a war of the powerful against the weak: a life which would require greater acceptance, love and care is considered useless, or held to be an intolerable burden, and is therefore rejected in one way or another. A person who, because of illness, handicap or, more simply, just by existing, compromises the well-being or life-style of those who are more favored tends to be looked upon as an enemy to be resisted or eliminated. In this way a kind of "conspiracy against life" is unleashed. This conspiracy involves not only individuals in their personal, family or group relationships, but goes far beyond, to the point of damaging and distorting, at the international level, relations between peoples and States” (n. 12). 

The efforts of those who build a Culture of Life must be sustained by prayer but not limited to prayer. Moses’ hands sustained in prayer were essential to victory, but the Israelites also had to fight. Likewise, we must pray for an end to abortion, but we must also speak, organize, lobby, vote, protest, and intervene. 

In both the first reading and the Gospel, the themes of “justice,” “deliverance,” and “securing rights” make for particular application to the unborn and vulnerable. 

Finally, this homily can provide an opportunity to invite people to join in the daily prayer campaign to end abortion, as found at www.PrayerCampaign.org.


Priests for Life
PO Box 141172 • Staten Island, NY 10314
Tel. 888-735-3448, (718) 980-4400 • Fax 718-980-6515
mail@priestsforlife.org