Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King Jr’ Category

Racism Must Die So That America Can Thrive.

Monday, August 14th, 2017

Friends, there is a reason why I’m Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn here in the 21st Century. As we see from the most recent racially motivated massacre in Virginia, racism is still alive and raising hell. Think about it. Racism is sin. Hatred is sin. Yet for whatever reason, the pot of domestic terrorism continues to be stirred under the guise of promoting “racial supremacy.” The big lie is that we are separate races, when in fact the spiritual, scientific and biological fact is that we are one blood; one human race [Acts 17:26] Racism and hatred are deadly. This is why I so often quote my Uncle MLK:

“We must learn to live together as brothers [and sisters], or perish together as fools. I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

We should be grateful that POTUS is calling for a cease fire on the violence. My King Family Legacy foundations have taught me that nonviolent conflict reconciliation is the key to ending these “race wars.”

“Love never fails.” 1 Corinthians 13

Trump condemns ‘white supremacists,’ other extremists behind deadly Virginia rallies

Watch Alveda on Sunday’s Fox & Friends.

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Also an article from Sophia Angeli Nelson:

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As one of God’s microphones, I’m often required to say what people don’t want to hear. Abortion is racism, in that abortion takes away the civil rights and lives of our weakest and most vulnerable members of the human race, unborn babies.

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Here’s an encapsulation of The King Family Legacy’s approach to nonviolent conflict resolution which is introduced here briefly:

SIX STEPS AND PRINCIPLES FOR NONVIOLENT SOCIAL CHANGE – A sequential journey to victory:
Principle 1: Nonviolence is not passive, but requires courage.
Principle 2: Nonviolence seeks reconciliation, not defeat of an adversary.
Principle 3: Nonviolent action is directed at eliminating evil, not destroying an evildoer.
Principle 4: A willingness to accept suffering for the cause, if necessary, but never to inflict it.
Principle 5: A rejection of hatred, animosity or violence of the spirit, as well as refusal to commit physical violence.
Principle 6: Faith that justice will prevail.

Six Steps of nonviolent conflict resolution:

(1.) Prayerfully gather facts.

(2.) Prayerfully educate adversaries and the public about the facts of the dispute.

(3.) Prayerfully commit yourself to live and manifest a nonviolent attitude and actions.

(4.) Prayerfully mediate and negotiate with adversaries in a spirit of goodwill to correct injustice.

(5.) Prayerfully apply nonviolent direct action, such as prayer vigils, marches, boycotts, mass demonstrations, picketing, sit-ins etc., to help persuade or compel adversary to work toward dispute-resolution.

(6.) Prayerfully anticipate reconciliation among adversaries in a win-win outcome in establishing a sense of community which should now be achievable.

Considering the times, I am grateful to be a part of a biological family as well as a spiritual family who embrace these truths. Won’t you join us?

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PRAY FOR AMERICA!

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Evangelist Alveda King urges: “MLK’s Dream Needs Help from God.”

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

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“I just want to do God’s will. And he’s allowed me to go to the mountain top. And I’ve looked over, and I’ve seen the Promised Land! I may not get there with you, but I want you to know tonight that we as a people will get to the Promised Land.” Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

“The world seems to have forgotten what Martin Luther King, Jr. knew; we need God’s help” said Evangelist Alveda King, Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life and niece of MLK. “Pray for President Trump, America, and the World. We must return to God.”

Yesterday, in the midst of planning to honor the MLK DREAM with a new Initiative, the Christian Evangelist woke up to the news that Reba McEntire and Lauren Daigle sang ‘Back to God’ at the 2017 ACM Awards. Evangelist King agrees that “as people of One Blood, we must repent, Pray and Unite. “Back to God’ was just the right direction for the times.

170404 blog image2“Today, April 4, 2017 marks the 49th Anniversary of the death of my Uncle. It is fitting therefore to call for the initial “A Time of Love and Reconciliation” which is being read by talk radio hosts of all political leanings drawing attention to H.R. 194 (110th), a resolution passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on July 29, 2008 that “apologize[d] to African Americans on behalf of the people of the United States, for the wrongs committed against them and their ancestors who suffered under slavery and Jim Crow” and “express[ed] its commitment to rectify the lingering consequences of the misdeeds committed against African Americans under slavery and Jim Crow and to stop the occurrence of human rights violations in the future.”

It’s an appropriate tribute to MLK’s 49th anniversary of his life and legacy. If he were here today, I believe he would agree with Ted Hays, leader of Heal America Collaborative, Reba and Lauren, and yes, me, and prayerfully lead people everywhere to return back to God,” urges Evangelist King.

“In the midst of life’s challenges; racism, war, poverty, human trafficking, abortion violence and evil of every kind; in order to escape the abyss, we need help from God to fulfill Uncle M. L.’s dream today! On this MLK Anniversary, as we join activist Ted Hayes with the launch of A Time of Love and Reconciliation,” God’s Word – “Return to Me” – is resonating across the atmospheres; reaching into the darkness and awakening a heavenly fire and light that cannot and will not be denied.

I’m honored to have my new book from Elijah List added to the cause; “AMERICA RETURN TO GOD” in proclaiming the very same message. If the Dream of my Uncle Martin Luther King, Jr. is to be fully received, we must return to, we must come back to God.

“My wayward children,” says the LORD, “come back to me, and I will heal your wayward hearts.”

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HAPPY NEW YEAR! Everyone,

Friday, January 6th, 2017

SPACER
I have a new book that I’d like to share with you today. I wrote America: Return To God because I believe it is needed for such a time as this. Please get the book at http://www.elijahlist.com/words/display_word.html?ID=17235

Book Cover

Also, I’m available for MLK Holiday spots from the road next week and from Atlanta studio Sunday night 1/15 after 7pm and on Monday 1/16 from 7am until 5pm.

Please book through Leslie Palma, media@priestsforlife.org or 347-286-7277.

Every year in January we take time to remember and celebrate the life of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This time has come to be known as MLK week. This year it takes place from January 10-16, 2017. I usually join my family at various events throughout the week.

State Rep. Alveda King, Daddy King, Dr. B. E. Mays, Speaker Tom Murphy, Mrs. Coretta King

State Rep. Alveda King, Daddy King, Dr. B. E. Mays, Speaker Tom Murphy, Mrs. Coretta King

Below are some events. More at The King Center.

1. Friday, January 13, 2017: 5:00 PM – 8:00 PM – Coretta Scott King’s Memoir – My Life, My Live, My Legacy Reception, Intimate Conversation & Book Signing with Dr. Bernice A. King and Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds. I won’t be able to attend but my mother, Mrs. Naomi Williams King will be there.

2. Sunday, January 15, 2017: 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM – Join me at this year’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Artistic Tribute 2017. A great time will be had by all. Register HERE. Only a few free reserved seats remain.

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3. Monday, January 16, 2017: 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM – Join Rev. Frank Pavone and Evangelist Alveda King at MLK Annual Commemorative Service.

4. Monday, January 16, 2017: 6:00 PM – 8:30 PM – I will participate in the Beloved Community Talk: Let’s Bridge The Racial Divide Across Urban Suburban and Rural America with Dr. Bernice King. Sen. Bernie Sanders, Gov. John Kasich and others in a candid conversation.

Following MLK Week I will be going to Washington, DC to attend some Inauguration events including the 2017 U.S. Presidential Inaugural: A Salute to African American Leaders: Celebrating the 58th Presidential Inauguration, Wed., January 18, 2017: 7:30 PM – 11:30 PM, The Good Sheppard, Good Samaritan Prayer Breakfast, Thur., January 19, 2017: 8:00 AM – 10:00 AM, and the 2017 U.S. Presidential Inaugural Gala, Thur., January 19, 2017.

January 22 is my birthday so I ask you to please pray for me as I prepare to go back to Washington on Friday, January 27 for the 23rd Annual National Memorial for the Pre-Born and their Mothers and Fathers, an ecumenical prayers service just prior to the March for Life. More information is available at www.NationalPrayerService.com.

I hope that some of you will be able to attend. If you don’t live in the area you can observe this week by joining us in prayer and spirit.

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How can MLK’s dream survive if the unborn are not protected?

Monday, April 4th, 2016

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: April 4, 2016

Contact: Leslie Palma
347-286-7277

Today is the 48th anniversary of the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The civil rights leader was in Memphis to support a sanitation workers’ strike when he was shot in the neck by a sniper as he stood on the second floor balcony of the Lorraine Motel. He was 39 years old.

Evangelist Alveda King is Martin Luther King’s niece and has devoted her life to an often overlooked aspect of the civil rights movement. As director of Civil Rights for the Unborn, the African-American outreach of Priests for Life, she advocates for the lives of the most defenseless victims, children in the womb.

“Today I feel very close to my uncle’s dream and vision for the 21st century,” she said. “However, in order to give genuine honor to the dream we must recognize an underrepresented group: The unborn. A woman has a right to choose what she does with her body. The baby is not her body. Where is the lawyer for the baby? How can the dream of Martin Luther King survive if we murder our children and desecrate the wombs of their mothers?”

Father Frank Pavone, National Director of Priests for Life, said that just as Martin Luther King gave his life for the civil rights movement, pro-lifers have to be willing to do the same for the one million babies lost every year to abortion in the U.S.

“As I wrote in my book Abolishing Abortion, we have to be ready to lay down our lives to end the violent segregation and prejudice of abortion,” Father Pavone said. “Martin Luther King and his brother, Rev. AD King, stopped at nothing to build the Beloved Community, and so must we. Let’s do what needs to be done.”

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit www.priestsforlife.org.

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2016 Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday

Friday, January 15th, 2016

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“I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.”
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Upon the occasion of the 2016 MLK Holiday, may we thankfully remember in prayer the ministry of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and “Let Freedom Ring” and “thank God that King had a dream.”

LET FREEDOM RING

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“My Uncle, Martin Luther King, Jr. Would Be Proud of our Supreme Court Case” Dr. Alveda King Comments on Priests for Life Challenge to #HHSMandate

Friday, November 13th, 2015

PriestsForLife

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Date: November 13, 2015

Contact: Leslie Palma
347-286-7277

NEW YORK — Dr. Alveda King, niece of Martin Luther King, Jr. and full-time Director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life, commented today on Priests for Life vs. HHS, a case that is one of seven that have just been accepted by the Supreme Court for review in the current term.

“I know that my father, Rev. A.D. King, and my Uncle, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would be proud to see my name on a lawsuit that seeks to protect freedom of religion,” Dr. King said. “I am taking this action on behalf of my daughters and granddaughters, all the young women I work with, and every American who refuses to be told how to practice their faith.”

Priests for Life was the fourth group to file a federal lawsuit against the HHS mandate, back in February 2012. The organization is represented by the American Freedom Law Center, and its lead attorneys Robert Muise and David Yerushalmi.

Also represented in the case, along with the Priests for Life organization itself, are Fr. Frank Pavone, National Director, and Janet Morana, Executive Director.

“I could not in good conscience provide access for my employees to the harmful products the mandate would require us to cover,” Mrs. Morana said. “My book, Recall Abortion, documents the harm so many have experienced.

“Moreover, the accommodation the Obama administration has come up with is no accommodation at all. I am opposing the mandate as an American who favors religious freedom, as a pro-life advocate whose organization exists precisely to protect human life, not take or harm it, and as a Catholic whose faith is unequivocal on these points.”

Priests for Life will host a press conference at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. For more information on the lawsuit, see www.IStandWithPFL.com.

Priests for Life is the nation’s largest Catholic pro-life organization dedicated to ending abortion and euthanasia. For more information, visit www.priestsforlife.org.

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God’s Love Trumps Human Laws: Prayers for America and our World

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

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During reflections and prayers for our nation and our world, in the midst of all the domestic and global upheaval, we need to remember that God’s love and natural law trumps human nature and common law. #Godslovematters.

“Leave your fatherless children; I will keep them alive; and let your widows trust in me.” For thus says the Lord: “If those who did not deserve to drink the cup must drink it, will you go unpunished? You shall not go unpunished, but you must drink.” – Jeremiah 49:11-12 ESV

In the midst of Planned Parenthood scandals, Black Lives Matter furor, global religious wars and unrest, and so much turmoil everywhere, let’s turn to Acts 17:26 – of one blood we are one human race, and as such should love each other as brothers and sisters.

Please view links after reading MLK words below. For present day relevance please include [persons] wherever “men” are noted. Thank you.

“In the spirit of the founding fathers of our nation and in the spirit of the Declaration of Independence, I would like to use as a subject from which to preach: “The American Dream.”” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. July 4, 1965

“It wouldn’t take us long to discover the substance of that dream. It is found in those majestic words of the Declaration of Independence, words lifted to cosmic proportions: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by God, Creator, with certain inalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.” This is a dream. It’s a great dream.

“The first saying we notice in this dream is an amazing universalism. It doesn’t say “some men,” it says “all men.” It doesn’t say “all white men,” it says “all men,” which includes black men. It does not say “all Gentiles,” it says “all men,” [persons] which includes Jews. It doesn’t say “all Protestants,” it says “all men,” which includes Catholics. (Yes, sir) It doesn’t even say “all theists and believers,” it says “all men,” which includes humanists and agnostics.

“Then that dream goes on to say another thing that ultimately distinguishes our nation and our form of government from any totalitarian system in the world. It says that each of us has certain basic rights that are neither derived from or conferred by the state. In order to discover where they came from, it is necessary to move back behind the dim mist of eternity. They are God-given, gifts from His hands. Never before in the history of the world has a sociopolitical document expressed in such profound, eloquent, and unequivocal language the dignity and the worth of human personality. The American dream reminds us, and we should think about it anew on this Independence Day, that every man [person] is an heir of the legacy of dignity and worth.”

http://bit.ly/1KCENQf (After clicking on link, click on “full screen’ button for best viewing)

You might also enjoy this tribute to my Mother, Mrs. Naomi King.

And finally, “Let not your heart faint, and be not fearful at the report heard in the land, when a report comes in one year and afterward a report in another year, and violence is in the land, and ruler is against ruler.” – Jeremiah 51:46 ESV

Please pray for America.

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A Call for Peace On The Million Man Anniversary

Friday, October 16th, 2015

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It’s been 20 years since the Million Man March called Black men to Washington, DC for a “day of atonement.” The eyes of the world were on what for many was hoped to be the next great March on Washington, picking up on the dream MLK unwrapped in 1963.

So, last week, nearly 20 years later, Minister Louis Farrakhan, Pastor Jeremiah Wright and others again drew crowds to Washington, D.C., under the banner “justice or else.”

Or else what? And even better, we should all ask: “What’s next?

In an open letter to Pope Francis, I recently asked these questions:

Can a Gentile love a Jew? Can a Muslim love a Christian? Is a baby in the womb a person? What is the meaning of love? Is sin a dirty word? Do we have to be filthy rich to be happy? Can the Lion really lie down with the Lamb? The point is, how do we find peace?

In two decades, many have forgotten the goal of reconciliation and given over to implied threats. Not to make light of the frustrations beleaguering the African American community, our nation and indeed the world, we must continue to teach and live out nonviolent solutions to our problems.

For example, just last week, my mother suffered a violent carjacking attack while attempting entry into her gated community. In her own words, she “was not scared or angry” at her young attacker,” she was “frustrated by the misguided effort” to take her property using physical force. In an open letter, she encouraged him to seek Jesus and nonviolence in order to fulfill his destiny.

The very next day, my Pastor and mentor of 28 years, Allen McNair, founder of Believers’ Bible Christian Church passed away. During his lifetime, he taught and demonstrated that the best way to encourage, assist and transform “Black America,” our communities, our cities, the nation and the world is with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

My father, Rev. A.D. King; my grandfather, Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr.; and my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., stood at the forefront of the cause of basic human rights. In spite of horrible violence perpetrated against them and other African Americans, they held fast to the truth that “hate is too great a burden to bear.” They fought on a platform of love, the one power that can overcome hate.

One of the attendees in the crowd 20 years ago was Barack Obama. He became President.

Today, Dr. Ben Carson is s leading candidates to replace the President. What was unthinkable in terms of race relations for the early decades of my life is now not only acceptable, but the new norm.

The lasting impact of the King Family Legacy is that we seek the way to lasting progress and change through love, not hate. Uncle M. L. once wrote: “Bomb our homes and threaten our children, and as difficult as it is, we will still love you.”

Having survived the bombing of my family home in Birmingham, believe me, I understand the difficulty of what he said. Having lived through decades of enormous advances in harmony between blacks, whites, and others in this country, I understand the correctness of what he said.

His timeless appeal still works with profound and amazing success.

Love builds. Hate destroys.

What is also obvious, however, is that of late we have seen instances of terrible injustices committed against African American men by police officers. We have also seen for years the ongoing injustice of black-on-black crime, an occurrence of which my own mother experienced a few days ago. Our response to this violence, though, should not be to take action that destroys our neighborhoods or tears down our social structures.

Our response should always be to pursue positive change. We need not be passive – the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was anything but passive!

To be effective and have a lasting impact, our actions must be rooted in love and respect for all. To lash out may be immediately satisfying, but vengeance is not only futile, it’s contagious.

When I heard a speaker at this year’s “justice or else” event chanting, “Down, down, USA!” it saddened me terribly. Not only was this speaker destructive, she was just plain wrong.

As one who sincerely prays for the peace of Jerusalem, which would ultimately lead to reconciliation among the natural and spiritual sons of Abraham, I am concerned about the lack of peaceful negotiations among the factions.

Our nation faces many trials. As the Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, I’m particularly grieved by our trampling of the civil rights of the unborn. But the United States has proven over and over again that, having been founded on righteous principles, we can ultimately only achieve justice by lifting up those principles, not tearing them down.

As Americans, members of the human family of Acts17:26, let us begin to meet our challenges by recognizing that each one of us, regardless of our station in life or our stage of life, is entitled to respect. Let each one of us, regardless of our color or ethnicity or even religious understanding, show concern for each other’s wellbeing.

Most of all let us love one another. That was my uncle’s dream, our family’s dream. It’s still rooted in the American Dream today.

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They Had a Dream: The Legacy of Granddaddy King – Father of Martin Luther King

Friday, June 19th, 2015

A GUEST BLOG BY KEVIN BURKE, LSW

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“Kevin has been a source of insight regarding the impact of and connection to abortion and the role of the father figure in the life of a little girl who grows up to become a mother. I hope that his blog will bless many with the same insight with which Kevin has blessed me.” – Dr. Alveda C. King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life

The King Family shared in a special way in the legacy of triumph and tragedy that marked the Civil Rights movement in the tumultuous decades of the 1950’s and 1960’s. It is widely known that their non-violent, prayerful resistance was a cornerstone of the strategy to dismantle the systemic structures of racism and violence that plagued so many African Americans. Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. and his brother A.D. King were very visible leaders of this movement. They embodied some of the best qualities of manly and fatherly leadership in their struggle for the civil rights of all Americans, especially the weakest and powerless in our society.

Where did these men find the courage and develop those Gospel-rooted values that led them to be such powerful advocates for the oppressed?

A lesser known part of the King Family legacy is the witness of Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. Many years before the Civil Rights movement and his son Martin’s famous “I have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963, Granddaddy King was already a strong advocate for the vulnerable and powerless. Thirteen years before that iconic speech in Washington D.C., Granddaddy King also had his own very special dream.

Dr. Alveda King is the daughter of A.D. King and Niece of Martin Luther King. Alveda gives us a glimpse into the heart and soul of her grandfather:

In 1950 my mother was pregnant with me and scared. She was looking for a doctor to perform a D&C abortion procedure. Granddaddy King told my mother:

“They (Planned Parenthood) are lying to you. That is not a lump of flesh. That’s my granddaughter. I saw her in a dream three years ago. She has bright skin and bright red hair and she’s going to bless many people.”

Research confirms that a father or grandfather’s reaction to an unplanned pregnancy is a significant influence on the mother’s decision to parent or abort the child.(1) Thankfully Granddaddy King stood up and defended the life of his unborn grandchild. Granddaddy and Alveda’s father promised to help her through that first unexpected pregnancy and Alveda was born to A. D. and Naomi Ruth Barber King on January 22, 1951. Over the years, Alveda’s mother recovered from her anger, finding grace in her relationship with Jesus Christ.

Years later the King family would lead millions of African Americans to great victories over the forces of racism. Granddaddy King’s famous sons would peacefully but powerfully advocate for the poor and oppressed African Americans whose civil rights, economic opportunity and God given dignity were being aborted by the institutionalized evil of racism.

Yet they also suffered a number of causalities. A.D. King died in a suspicious and tragic drowning accident a year after the assassination of his brother Martin Luther King. The death of Alveda’s father inflicted a deep wound on Alveda’s heart and soul at the same time the sexual revolution and abortion rights were in rapid ascent. Alveda shares:

During those years of my life, I made some scared and angry decisions, including having two of what was presented to me as “safe and legal abortions.” The first procedure was an involuntary abortion. The pro -abortion philosophy was empowering physicians to use their considerable influence to advocate for abortion. Sometimes they simply took matters in their own hands and boldly played God with vulnerable women and their unborn children.

Shortly before the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 I went to my doctor to ask why my monthly cycle had not resumed after the birth of my son. I did not ask for and did not want an abortion. The doctor said, “You certainly don’t need to be pregnant…let’s take a look.” He proceeded to perform a painful examination which resulted in a gush of blood and tissue emanating from my womb. He explained that he had performed a “local D and C.”

Sadly, the rise of pro abortion feminism was empowering men to embrace values that were radically different than those modeled by Granddaddy King and his famous sons. Rather than defending and protected the powerless entrusted to their care, men were being corrupted by the philosophy and practice of abortion rights and the rhetoric of choice.

Just a few short years after Martin Luther King was assassinated for his mission to protect and empower those oppressed by racism, black fathers were now participating in the death of their unborn black children; the same children that Dr Martin Luther King dreamed would one day live in a country “where children…will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” (Speech of MLK 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.)

Alveda: I never was able to process the trauma from that forced abortion. Soon after the Roe v. Wade decision, I became pregnant again. There was adverse pressure and threat of violence from the baby’s father now that abortion was legal and readily accessible. The ease and convenience provided through Roe v. Wade made it too easy for me to make the fateful and fatal decision to abort our child.

Granddaddy King saved Alveda’s life in 1950. Twenty-five years later he once again stood tall and reached out to Alveda, now reeling after 2 unresolved abortion losses, to pull back from the precipice of deeper death and destruction:

Alveda: Granddaddy MLK, Sr. rescued me again in 1975. He and my son’s father promised to help me if I wouldn’t abort my next baby. I believed them, thank God.

But Alveda would still suffer the after affects of her abortion losses. She shares about the Shockwaves of Abortion and their impact on her life and family:

Over the next few years, I experienced medical problems. I had trouble bonding with my son, and his five siblings who were born after the abortions. I began to suffer from eating disorders, depression, nightmares, sexual dysfunctions and a host of other issues related to the abortion that I chose to have. I felt angry about both abortions, and very guilty about the abortion I chose to have. The guilt made me very ill.

My children have all suffered from knowing that they have a brother or sister that their mother chose to abort. Often they ask if I ever thought about aborting them and have said, “You killed our baby.” This is very painful for all of us. Also, my mother and grandparents were very sad to know about the loss of the baby. The aborted child’s father also regrets the abortion. If it had not been for Roe v. Wade, I would never have had that abortion. Thankfully, through God’s merciful healing we continue to recover and heal as a family from the pain and loss of those abortion losses.

When you look at the sacrifice and legacy of the King family in their battle for racial equality and justice, it is truly an abomination for Planned Parenthood and other abortion advocates to spread the propaganda that abortion is a woman’s civil right. The struggle for civil rights for African Americans was a movement led by men and women who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice; they were ready to take a courageous stand and if necessary give their lives for those oppressed by racism and violence. Granddaddy King and his sons Martin Luther and A.D. King, and many other brave African American men embodied this model of manhood and fatherhood.

As we come to another Father’s Day celebration, let’s remember these men and emulate their values and sacrifice. Let us pray for those minority communities that have been especially targeted by abortion providers, and the fathers, mothers and families that have been devastated by the Shockwaves of Abortion.

“The Negro cannot win as long as he is willing to sacrifice the lives of his children for comfort and safety.”– Dr Martin Luther King
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1. Aborted Women: Silent No More, David Reardon, Loyola University Press, Chicago, 1987

To read Alveda King’s testimony click HERE

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An Unplanned “PRAY IN” On My Birthday

Friday, January 30th, 2015

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Last week hundreds of thousands of pro-lifers descended on Washington for the March for Life on January 22, 2015, the anniversary of the court ruling of Roe vs. Wade which made it possible for millions of babies to be killed at the altar of “choice.”

150129 blog image6Every year the march is followed up by women and men of the Silent No More Awareness Campaign giving our testimonies of regretted abortions on the Supreme Court steps. This year there was even a former abortionist, Dr. Anthony Levatino, who regrets performing abortions.

150129 blog image1As I was sitting in front of the Supreme Court that day, my sixty-fourth birthday no less, the back and forth challenges between the pro-abortion protesters on one side and the pro-life marchers on the other side began to heat up. I began thinking of my uncle’s words, “We must learn to live together as brothers [and sisters] or perish as fools;” and I began to pray. As I prayed, I became grieved in my heart, and seemed to be lead by the Spirit of God to walk between the two groups and then lie down in the street with a sanctity of life sign and pray.

150129 blog image5As I walked towards the young people I watched pro-abortion protesters with their white pants splotched with red [paint] “blood” between their legs; some waving coat hangers and hurling profanity into the air, my heart ached and I felt moved to pray for them.

I also prayed for my Pro-Life brothers and sisters who rallied to answer the pro-abortion voices. I thought about God’s Love and how people, not knowing and understanding John 3:16, are perishing for lack of the knowledge of the Love of God.

150129 blog image8Somehow, the image of Dr. Billy Graham and my Uncle MLK preaching ad praying together against racism and segregation in the nineteen fifties fits in here. I’m praying that the racist roots of Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood will be broken.

However, I digress. The pro-abortion protesters were shouting for “reproductive rights” not seeming to understand that they were promoting death as a solution. Somehow, I just wanted to take them in my arms and lovingly explain to them, “Don’t you understand that every human person has the same right as you and me, the right to life? And that choice that you are fighting for is the choice to kill a tiny human person? And mothers and dads and everybody suffers from such choices?”

Alveda lying in street at SNMACThere was no room for my voice, there was so much shouting. So, I lay down on the ground and I quietly prayed for God to help us love each other and stop the killing.

Someone shouted, “get off of our property.” I thought about sitting up and explaining that we all had the constitutional right to be there; but I just kept on praying, oh Jesus!

Then, a young man looked down at me and shouted something like “who is that old *!@!#*! African American woman on the ground?” Someone said Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” He ran away into the crowd.

As the prolife marchers began to gather for the SILENT NO MORE rally, it was time to join #HealingTheShockwavesOfAbortion, so my colleagues pulled me up from the ground, and I walked over to the stage and gave testimony of my regretted abortions before the crowd. The voices of the pro-abortion protesters began to fade. Some were being arrested for acting out.

My “pray in” demonstration was unplanned; stirred by a heart of contrition and compassion. Yet, I will keep praying, whether standing, sitting, kneeling or from the ground, every year that the Lord permits me to and I will continue to pray for all humanity, not just until the day that we abolish abortion in America and around the world; but until God’s love breaks through the stony hearts and HIS glory is revealed.

 

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