Archive for the ‘Martin Luther King Sr’ Category

A Call for Peace On The Million Man Anniversary

Friday, October 16th, 2015

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It’s been 20 years since the Million Man March called Black men to Washington, DC for a “day of atonement.” The eyes of the world were on what for many was hoped to be the next great March on Washington, picking up on the dream MLK unwrapped in 1963.

So, last week, nearly 20 years later, Minister Louis Farrakhan, Pastor Jeremiah Wright and others again drew crowds to Washington, D.C., under the banner “justice or else.”

Or else what? And even better, we should all ask: “What’s next?

In an open letter to Pope Francis, I recently asked these questions:

Can a Gentile love a Jew? Can a Muslim love a Christian? Is a baby in the womb a person? What is the meaning of love? Is sin a dirty word? Do we have to be filthy rich to be happy? Can the Lion really lie down with the Lamb? The point is, how do we find peace?

In two decades, many have forgotten the goal of reconciliation and given over to implied threats. Not to make light of the frustrations beleaguering the African American community, our nation and indeed the world, we must continue to teach and live out nonviolent solutions to our problems.

For example, just last week, my mother suffered a violent carjacking attack while attempting entry into her gated community. In her own words, she “was not scared or angry” at her young attacker,” she was “frustrated by the misguided effort” to take her property using physical force. In an open letter, she encouraged him to seek Jesus and nonviolence in order to fulfill his destiny.

The very next day, my Pastor and mentor of 28 years, Allen McNair, founder of Believers’ Bible Christian Church passed away. During his lifetime, he taught and demonstrated that the best way to encourage, assist and transform “Black America,” our communities, our cities, the nation and the world is with the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

My father, Rev. A.D. King; my grandfather, Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr.; and my uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., stood at the forefront of the cause of basic human rights. In spite of horrible violence perpetrated against them and other African Americans, they held fast to the truth that “hate is too great a burden to bear.” They fought on a platform of love, the one power that can overcome hate.

One of the attendees in the crowd 20 years ago was Barack Obama. He became President.

Today, Dr. Ben Carson is s leading candidates to replace the President. What was unthinkable in terms of race relations for the early decades of my life is now not only acceptable, but the new norm.

The lasting impact of the King Family Legacy is that we seek the way to lasting progress and change through love, not hate. Uncle M. L. once wrote: “Bomb our homes and threaten our children, and as difficult as it is, we will still love you.”

Having survived the bombing of my family home in Birmingham, believe me, I understand the difficulty of what he said. Having lived through decades of enormous advances in harmony between blacks, whites, and others in this country, I understand the correctness of what he said.

His timeless appeal still works with profound and amazing success.

Love builds. Hate destroys.

What is also obvious, however, is that of late we have seen instances of terrible injustices committed against African American men by police officers. We have also seen for years the ongoing injustice of black-on-black crime, an occurrence of which my own mother experienced a few days ago. Our response to this violence, though, should not be to take action that destroys our neighborhoods or tears down our social structures.

Our response should always be to pursue positive change. We need not be passive – the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was anything but passive!

To be effective and have a lasting impact, our actions must be rooted in love and respect for all. To lash out may be immediately satisfying, but vengeance is not only futile, it’s contagious.

When I heard a speaker at this year’s “justice or else” event chanting, “Down, down, USA!” it saddened me terribly. Not only was this speaker destructive, she was just plain wrong.

As one who sincerely prays for the peace of Jerusalem, which would ultimately lead to reconciliation among the natural and spiritual sons of Abraham, I am concerned about the lack of peaceful negotiations among the factions.

Our nation faces many trials. As the Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life, I’m particularly grieved by our trampling of the civil rights of the unborn. But the United States has proven over and over again that, having been founded on righteous principles, we can ultimately only achieve justice by lifting up those principles, not tearing them down.

As Americans, members of the human family of Acts17:26, let us begin to meet our challenges by recognizing that each one of us, regardless of our station in life or our stage of life, is entitled to respect. Let each one of us, regardless of our color or ethnicity or even religious understanding, show concern for each other’s wellbeing.

Most of all let us love one another. That was my uncle’s dream, our family’s dream. It’s still rooted in the American Dream today.

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They Had a Dream: The Legacy of Granddaddy King – Father of Martin Luther King

Friday, June 19th, 2015


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“Kevin has been a source of insight regarding the impact of and connection to abortion and the role of the father figure in the life of a little girl who grows up to become a mother. I hope that his blog will bless many with the same insight with which Kevin has blessed me.” – Dr. Alveda C. King, Director of African American Outreach for Priests for Life

The King Family shared in a special way in the legacy of triumph and tragedy that marked the Civil Rights movement in the tumultuous decades of the 1950’s and 1960’s. It is widely known that their non-violent, prayerful resistance was a cornerstone of the strategy to dismantle the systemic structures of racism and violence that plagued so many African Americans. Dr Martin Luther King, Jr. and his brother A.D. King were very visible leaders of this movement. They embodied some of the best qualities of manly and fatherly leadership in their struggle for the civil rights of all Americans, especially the weakest and powerless in our society.

Where did these men find the courage and develop those Gospel-rooted values that led them to be such powerful advocates for the oppressed?

A lesser known part of the King Family legacy is the witness of Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. Many years before the Civil Rights movement and his son Martin’s famous “I have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in 1963, Granddaddy King was already a strong advocate for the vulnerable and powerless. Thirteen years before that iconic speech in Washington D.C., Granddaddy King also had his own very special dream.

Dr. Alveda King is the daughter of A.D. King and Niece of Martin Luther King. Alveda gives us a glimpse into the heart and soul of her grandfather:

In 1950 my mother was pregnant with me and scared. She was looking for a doctor to perform a D&C abortion procedure. Granddaddy King told my mother:

“They (Planned Parenthood) are lying to you. That is not a lump of flesh. That’s my granddaughter. I saw her in a dream three years ago. She has bright skin and bright red hair and she’s going to bless many people.”

Research confirms that a father or grandfather’s reaction to an unplanned pregnancy is a significant influence on the mother’s decision to parent or abort the child.(1) Thankfully Granddaddy King stood up and defended the life of his unborn grandchild. Granddaddy and Alveda’s father promised to help her through that first unexpected pregnancy and Alveda was born to A. D. and Naomi Ruth Barber King on January 22, 1951. Over the years, Alveda’s mother recovered from her anger, finding grace in her relationship with Jesus Christ.

Years later the King family would lead millions of African Americans to great victories over the forces of racism. Granddaddy King’s famous sons would peacefully but powerfully advocate for the poor and oppressed African Americans whose civil rights, economic opportunity and God given dignity were being aborted by the institutionalized evil of racism.

Yet they also suffered a number of causalities. A.D. King died in a suspicious and tragic drowning accident a year after the assassination of his brother Martin Luther King. The death of Alveda’s father inflicted a deep wound on Alveda’s heart and soul at the same time the sexual revolution and abortion rights were in rapid ascent. Alveda shares:

During those years of my life, I made some scared and angry decisions, including having two of what was presented to me as “safe and legal abortions.” The first procedure was an involuntary abortion. The pro -abortion philosophy was empowering physicians to use their considerable influence to advocate for abortion. Sometimes they simply took matters in their own hands and boldly played God with vulnerable women and their unborn children.

Shortly before the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973 I went to my doctor to ask why my monthly cycle had not resumed after the birth of my son. I did not ask for and did not want an abortion. The doctor said, “You certainly don’t need to be pregnant…let’s take a look.” He proceeded to perform a painful examination which resulted in a gush of blood and tissue emanating from my womb. He explained that he had performed a “local D and C.”

Sadly, the rise of pro abortion feminism was empowering men to embrace values that were radically different than those modeled by Granddaddy King and his famous sons. Rather than defending and protected the powerless entrusted to their care, men were being corrupted by the philosophy and practice of abortion rights and the rhetoric of choice.

Just a few short years after Martin Luther King was assassinated for his mission to protect and empower those oppressed by racism, black fathers were now participating in the death of their unborn black children; the same children that Dr Martin Luther King dreamed would one day live in a country “where children…will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” (Speech of MLK 28 August 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.)

Alveda: I never was able to process the trauma from that forced abortion. Soon after the Roe v. Wade decision, I became pregnant again. There was adverse pressure and threat of violence from the baby’s father now that abortion was legal and readily accessible. The ease and convenience provided through Roe v. Wade made it too easy for me to make the fateful and fatal decision to abort our child.

Granddaddy King saved Alveda’s life in 1950. Twenty-five years later he once again stood tall and reached out to Alveda, now reeling after 2 unresolved abortion losses, to pull back from the precipice of deeper death and destruction:

Alveda: Granddaddy MLK, Sr. rescued me again in 1975. He and my son’s father promised to help me if I wouldn’t abort my next baby. I believed them, thank God.

But Alveda would still suffer the after affects of her abortion losses. She shares about the Shockwaves of Abortion and their impact on her life and family:

Over the next few years, I experienced medical problems. I had trouble bonding with my son, and his five siblings who were born after the abortions. I began to suffer from eating disorders, depression, nightmares, sexual dysfunctions and a host of other issues related to the abortion that I chose to have. I felt angry about both abortions, and very guilty about the abortion I chose to have. The guilt made me very ill.

My children have all suffered from knowing that they have a brother or sister that their mother chose to abort. Often they ask if I ever thought about aborting them and have said, “You killed our baby.” This is very painful for all of us. Also, my mother and grandparents were very sad to know about the loss of the baby. The aborted child’s father also regrets the abortion. If it had not been for Roe v. Wade, I would never have had that abortion. Thankfully, through God’s merciful healing we continue to recover and heal as a family from the pain and loss of those abortion losses.

When you look at the sacrifice and legacy of the King family in their battle for racial equality and justice, it is truly an abomination for Planned Parenthood and other abortion advocates to spread the propaganda that abortion is a woman’s civil right. The struggle for civil rights for African Americans was a movement led by men and women who were willing to make the ultimate sacrifice; they were ready to take a courageous stand and if necessary give their lives for those oppressed by racism and violence. Granddaddy King and his sons Martin Luther and A.D. King, and many other brave African American men embodied this model of manhood and fatherhood.

As we come to another Father’s Day celebration, let’s remember these men and emulate their values and sacrifice. Let us pray for those minority communities that have been especially targeted by abortion providers, and the fathers, mothers and families that have been devastated by the Shockwaves of Abortion.

“The Negro cannot win as long as he is willing to sacrifice the lives of his children for comfort and safety.”– Dr Martin Luther King
1. Aborted Women: Silent No More, David Reardon, Loyola University Press, Chicago, 1987

To read Alveda King’s testimony click HERE

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New How To Book: King Rules for You!

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

King Rules - High ResBook Debut:
Today, June 10, 2014

Dear Readers, this blog hits close to home for me today, so close in fact that I named the first chapter in my new book “Make Home a Priority.” Some of you have been asking me for years, “what was it like growing up with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as your uncle?”

Well dear readers, this book is just for you! Not only do I write about my Uncle ML, but you will meet my daddy AD King, my Granddaddy MLK, Sr., and so many other family members who helped to make sure that I grew up in “The King Family Legacy,” full of faith, hope, and love.

Please take a moment to visit the Thomas Nelson website: to discover not only what the book is about, but also take a look through the photo album where you will have a peek into some precious memories. There are also some endorsements from some friends you might know.

Finally, this is a “how to book” in that many of the principles in the book about finding peace, love, and joy while fighting for justice for everyone, from conception until natural death and everything between.

My friends the Honorable J. C. Watts and Father Frank Pavone graciously opened and closed the chapters for me in their foreward and afterword. All in all, having been inspired by so many questions, I went on a quest to find the answers and discovered that the King Rules were with me all the time.

God bless you!

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A Travel Guide to Life: Don’t leave home without it!

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

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A good author should recognize the gift in a colleague, and also acknowledge that gift. I’ll let you be the judge of my penmanship when my newest book KING RULES hits the stand on June 10.

Meanwhile, please read the latest offering, A TRAVEL GUIDE TO LIFE, by my friend Anthony DeStefano. The book, one in a series of TRAVEL GUIDES, is filled with insights and how to’s straight from the pen of one who successfully navigates the ups and downs of life with candor, humility, repentance and humor.

To date this new release becomes a favorite, although all of Anthony’s books are super. My grandchildren adore his children’s books. We recently read A TRAVEL GUIDE TO HEAVEN FOR CHILDREN. Delightful!

On a personal note, I remember praying for Anthony when he was preparing for his father’s transition from this life. He stoically bore it all while helping others to navigate their way through such a trying season.

I also remember Anthony tolerating my monologue about why I’m a Star Trek fan. I was lamenting about how my critics consider my Sci-Fi passion to be sinful. After all, they reason, “Christians don’t have time for fantasy. Jesus is the real deal.”

Yes, Jesus is real, and thank God for His Blood, His Love, His Mercy and HIS Grace. I’m not perfect, and we all need prayer.

I remember Anthony saying: “Alveda, we’re not perfect in this life. You pray for me, I’ll pray for you.”

On that note, I’ll close here with a prayer that you’ll read our books and enjoy them. We all need a good TRAVEL GUIDE. Don’t leave home without this gem. Blessings.

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Put the Political Strife Out to Pasture

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

Martin and Billy

I have few regrets in my life. At the top of the list is the demise of two children in my womb, and one miscarriage. Next to that, I regret having said to a group of peers that my Uncle M. L. (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.) was a Republican. I said that without having all the facts. My Grandfather, Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. was a registered Republican. Uncle M. L. was an independent, who in his own words tended to vote Democrat. I assumed that since Granddaddy was a Republican, Uncle M. L. was too. After all, before the election of President John F. Kennedy, the majority of African American voters were Republicans. Granddaddy convinced a large block of Blacks to vote for President John Kennedy after he helped to get my uncle out of jail during those turbulent days. Uncle M. L. tended to vote Democrat, but remained independent because he found weaknesses in both parties. The truth of the matter is that God isn’t a Republican or a Democrat or a Tea Party voter. God doesn’t vote. The squabbling and division among the parties is tragic.

Wise Christian leaders such as Dr. Billy Graham and others who have visited the White House over the years to advise sitting presidents have focused on the times and not the parties. I’m beginning to understand the wisdom of such. As a result, I am no longer endorsing political candidates, choosing rather to vote responsibly and to follow the Bible instructions that we must pray for all people, including those in authority.

Pray for All People: 1First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, 2for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. 3This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, 4who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth. (1 Timothy chapter 2)

Please review below for Uncle M. L.’s perspective:

As a Christian leader and civil rights activist, Uncle M. L. followed a pattern of not publicly endorsing a U.S. political party or candidate. He wrote: “I feel someone must remain in the position of non-alignment, so that he can look objectively at both parties and be the conscience of both—not the servant or master of either.” In a 1958 interview, he expressed his view that neither party was perfect, saying, “I don’t think the Republican party is a party full of the almighty God nor is the Democratic party. They both have weaknesses … And I’m not inextricably bound to either party.”

He also assessed both parties’ performance on promoting racial equality:

“Actually, the Negro has been betrayed by both the Republican and the Democratic party. The Democrats have betrayed him by capitulating to the whims and caprices of the Southern Dixiecrats. The Republicans have betrayed him by capitulating to the blatant hypocrisy of reactionary right wing northern Republicans. And this coalition of southern Dixiecrats and right wing reactionary northern Republicans defeats every bill and every move towards liberal legislation in the area of civil rights.”

Although he never publicly supported a political party or candidate for president, in a letter to a civil rights supporter in October 1956 he wrote: “In the past I always voted the Democratic ticket.” In 1960, like my grandfather, he privately voted for John F. Kennedy: “I felt that Kennedy would make the best president. I never came out with an endorsement. My father did, but I never made one.” He also went so far as to consider making one endorsement: “Had President Kennedy lived, I would probably have endorsed him in 1964.

Surely it is possible to be a Republican, Democrat, Tea Party Member, Green Party, Libertarian, Christian Party Member or affiliate with any party one chooses, and not hate our brothers and sisters who choose another path. Church denominations and political divisions make too many enemies when we need to be united in this one human race that dominates this planet. As one who has been elected to office as a Georgia State Representative (D), served as a presidential appointee (R) and who have often voted as an Independent, I can truly say that we would all be better off without the political squabbles that tend to divide us.

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Life’s Perspectives from Daddy King

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

(Please view video MY SHOES at the end.)

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My grandfather Dr. Martin Luther King, Sr. once told my then abortion minded pregnant mother this: “Neenie (her nickname), you can’t abort this baby. She’s a little girl with bright skin and bright red hair. I saw her in a dream three years ago, and she’s going to bless many people. What a prophetic miracle. That dream saved my life long before ultrasound was invented!

When I was born on January 22, 1951 my joyful daddy, Rev. Alfred Daniel Williams King named me Alveda Celeste King. He once told me the Al was part of his name because I am “part of him.” (23 of 46 chromosomes in fact)

The French and Italian word for life is Vitae. So he combined the two to name Alveda. Celeste came from my great-grandmother Jennie Celeste Parks. Daddy said it sounded celestial and he wanted to get me as close to Heaven as possible.

As time went on, what with bombings and shootings and killings and other terrors, in the midst of trying and troubling times in the “King Family Legacy,” Granddaddy used to preach about thanking God for what we have left. He had a special saying: “I used to cry because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet.”

Often when I remember these cherished moments in my life, someone says or does something to remind me of other special memories about them. Today my very good friend sent me a link to a special film project: MY SHOES. It reminds me of Granddaddy’s sermon.

Please view this short film and remember that sometimes when life seems hard, we should consider and reconsider the perspectives before we make our choices.


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